Author: The Lion

Missed the 8th Annual Columbia Powwow this year? Watch creative team member Shyanne Yellowbird’s video recap to relive this event…and make sure you don’t miss out on next year’s!

About the Event

Native American Council’s 8th Annual Powwow was held on Saturday, April 14. The Powwow is an event at which indigenous communities and their allies unite to celebrate and honor their identities through dance, singing and socialization.

Native American Council opened the space to the indigenous community on campus as well as the greater community at Columbia University, NYC and the tri-state area.

(Description adapted from Undergraduate Student Life blurb)

Image Courtesy of NOMADS

Not sure what to do next weekend? Check out NOMADS’s latest production!

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Image Courtesy of NOMADS

On November 16, NOMADS will be debuting Cold Whole Milk, an original new play by Sarah Billings. Come to the Glicker-Milstein Theatre in the Diana Center to see the story of Margaret and Jack, a young married couple living in a quiet mid-20th century neighborhood. As they struggle to honestly communicate with each other about their desires and identities, their lives run parallel to the lives of the milkman and the mailman who come by every morning. They all seem set in their ways until visit from a door-to-door hairbrush salesgirl inspires Margaret and Jack to reexamine what they really want from the world and each other. At the same time, the milkman and the mailman begin to see each other in a new light. Cold Whole Milk is a vibrant, unashamed affirmation of the beauty of queer love that celebrates the bravery of all individuals courageous enough to live as their truest selves.

Tickets are on sale through the TIC and are available both online and in person for $5 (with a Columbia or Barnard student ID), or $7 (without an ID). The show will be running November 16-18, and you can RSVP to the Facebook event here. From the cast and crew: we hope to see you there!

 

Want to feature your club’s updates here? Email submissions@columbialion.com

Here at Columbia, students commonly refer to how flaky students can be. As defined by Urban Dictionary, flaky means:

An unreliable person. A procrastinator. A careless or lazy person. Dishonest and doesn’t keep to their word. They’ll tell you they’re going to do one thing, and never do it. They’ll tell you that they’ll meet you somewhere, and show up an hour late or don’t show up at all. Also spelled “flakey“, or “flake” in the noun form.

Now while this is a topic that comes up on campus often, we decided to ask students to share their thoughts. To do so, we messaged random Columbia students on Facebook and sent them the following:

Hi!

I’m currently working on a piece about community at Columbia and I’m trying to gather a few thoughts about this (fairly open-ended) question: Do you think Columbia students are ‘flaky’ (adj: Unreliable, characterized by not following through on agreed plans)? If so, why?

Your response would be anonymous unless you want it to be visible.

Here are the responses we got back:

“I don’t know if they’re flaky as much as they do the absolute most. I feel like Columbia students don’t see value in something if they cannot put it on their resume. like why must you be in 5 organizations, have an internship, and a “good” gpa. especially if you don’t really give a shit about 2/3 of those things”  – CC ‘18

“Hey! Not so sure if I’m in a position to generalize, but in some of my past experiences, yes. The “let’s hang out next time” is a phrase I hear all the time. Columbia students tend to sign up for more than they can actually take on, whether that be going to events or joining clubs. I think it’s mostly due to the fact that we always seem to need to be busy or at least appear busy and doing something productive” – SEAS ’19

“I think Columbia students are flaky because they have so many options and frequently a pretty strong hierarchy of importance. I don’t think we can fault us for this, except if we held the belief that reliability (in terms of following through with plans) should be higher on the priorities list.” –  CC ’20

“People here do the most usually” – CC ’18

“I don’t think any more so than anywhere else” – GS ’19

What do you think? Are Columbia students more flaky than average? Let us know in the comments below or by emailing us at team@columbialion.com

Following up a previous email from Professor Goldberg, the University Provost has emailed students to make them aware of the Rules of University Conduct, likely related to recent protests of speakers invited to campus by CUCR.

In particular, he notes that students actively disrupting speakers are subject to being disciplined, confirming reports noted by Zack Abrams (CC ’21).

 

The full email can be found below.

Dear fellow members of the Columbia community:

 

As President Bollinger made clear in his Commencement Address last May, freedom of speech is a core value of our institution. The University is committed to defend the right of all the members of our community to exercise their right to invite, listen to, and challenge speakers whose views may be offensive and even hurtful to many of us. It is the duty of every member of the community to help preserve freedom of speech for all, including protesters.

 

This duty does not evaporate when the freedom we enjoy protects community members who invite speakers made famous by grotesquely unfounded and unethical attacks on people whose presence at Columbia, and in the surrounding Harlem community, contribute so much to the diversity that makes us great.

 

Two years ago, after broad consultation, the Columbia Board of Trustees adopted amended “Rules of University Conduct” to protect freedom of speech for invited speakers and their audiences, as well as for protesters. Since a number of controversial speakers are already scheduled to come to Columbia in the coming weeks and months, it may be helpful for members of the community, especially students, to keep the following points in mind.

 

  • It is a violation of the Rules of University Conduct to interrupt, shout down, or otherwise disrupt an event.
  • It is also a violation to obstruct the view of the speaker with banners or placards.
  • Individuals engaged in disruption will be asked to identify themselves by a Delegate or Public Safety Officer; it is an additional violation of the Rules to refuse to do so.
  • Delegates or Public Safety Officers will request that individuals stop disrupting (e.g., stop shouting, sit down, move to another location); individuals who fail to comply promptly with such a request may be subject to interim sanctions up to and including suspension by the Provost for the rest of the semester.
  • On receiving reports of a violation of the Rules of University Conduct, the Rules Administrator will investigate to determine whether a Rules violation may have occurred. The Rules Administrator may meet with students or others involved in a disruption to determine if an informal resolution is possible.
  • If informal resolution is not possible, the disciplinary process will continue with the Rules Administrator filing a formal complaint with the University Judicial Board. That Board will follow the procedures specified in the Rules of Conduct. Repeated violations of the Rules of Conduct will be subject to greater penalties.

 

More detailed information on University free speech policies and procedures is now available on the website of the Office of University Life.

 

John H. Coatsworth

Starting next week, late night package service will be available thanks to Columbia Mail’s new package offerings. Students will be able to send in a request by 3PM on the day their package arrives and request for it to be left in one of the 28 new lockers in the basement of Wien Hall. With this new option, students will be able to pick up their package after the Package Center closes meaning students with high priority items will not need to be stressed if they could not grab their package in time.

The full email can be found below:

Located on the lower level of Wien Hall, lockers will be available upon request starting Monday, October 16. How it works:

  • Lockers are accessible only when the Student Mail Center is closed.
  • Locker space is limited and so usage is prioritized for critical needs, such as:
    • medication (non-perishable only, lockers are not refrigerated)
    • time-sensitive materials (e.g. employment documents, identification)
    • items of high value (e.g. cell phone, laptop)
  • There are 28 lockers in total, the largest being 22x16x13.5 (LxWxH). Over-sized packages are not eligible for lockers.
  • To request a locker, students should reply to the email notification received when mail or a package has arrived.
  • Lockers cannot be reserved for mail or packages before they are received and processed at the Student Mail Center.
  • Students that are unable to reach high or bend down should indicate that a mid-level locker is needed.
  • The email request must be received by 3:00 p.m. the day the locker is needed in order to be considered.
  • By 5:00 p.m., Student Mail will send a confirmation email with a 6-digit pin to open the locker.
  • If the item is not picked up by 9:00 a.m. the following morning, the item will be removed from the locker and returned to the Student Mail Center for pick up. The student will not receive further email notifications.