Author: The Lion

As the Columbia University College Republicans prepare to host Tommy Robinson, a speaker known for his inflammatory remarks for a talk about “Europe and mass immigration,” Professor Goldberg, the head of University Life, has emailed students explaining the University’s rationale for allowing speakers such as Robinson.

The full email can be found below:

Dear Students,

There is much in the news about contentious speakers on campuses around the country, including our own. And while some students welcome these debates, others raise serious concerns about the negative impact of white supremacists and others who express hostile and derogatory views on race, religion and gender. These kinds of messages, as you know, contradict Columbia’s core commitment to the value of all members of our community and to diversity among our students, faculty and staff, as President Bollinger has often made clear.

Against this backdrop, here’s an abbreviated explanation of why the University allows student organizations to invite speakers whose views conflict so directly with our institutional values:  It is foundational to Columbia’s learning and teaching missions that we allow for the contestation of ideas. This includes expression of ideas that are deeply unpopular, offensive to many in our community, contrary to research-based understandings, and antagonistic to University tenets.

Without this policy, the University would be in a position of deciding which views our community should hear and which it should not. Perhaps needless to say, there is often not consensus about when speakers cross the line into being impermissible. Having University officials decide which ideas outside speakers can express on campus also poses serious risks to academic freedom.

Still, when white supremacist, anti-Muslim and similar speakers come to campus, Columbia has an important responsibility to make clear our values:  that we reject those views and maintain our commitment to fostering a vibrant community founded on the fundamental dignity and worth of all of our members, as our nondiscrimination statement provides. We also support research, teaching and other opportunities for community members and the public to learn more about the deep flaws in these speakers’ views. And our Rules of University Conduct, while protecting these speakers’ right to speak without disruption, also strongly protect protesters in expressing their views.

In the coming weeks, you will have opportunities to participate in campus conversations and also learn more about these issues, including at Awakening Our Democracy: Free Speech on Campus on November 1 (register here). If you have additional ideas for how we might strengthen our efforts to reject the messages of these speakers, short of barring student organizations from inviting them to campus, I welcome your sharing them.

Yours truly,

Professor Suzanne B. Goldberg
Executive Vice President for University Life
Herbert and Doris Wechsler Clinical Professor of Law

In addition to tonight’s talk, several students groups are hosting alternate events from Columbia University Democrats to various direct protests of the event.

For some students, today is the last day to drop a class without it appearing on your transcript. Still on the fence about whether to drop a class or two? Here’s some tips we’ve compiled from current upperclassmen about when to drop a course.

Your entire grade is the midterm and final. This is a recipe for disaster. We all think we’re going to study a week in advance and be super duper prepared for the exams, but everyone procrastinates. You’ll wait until the night before and all of a sudden realize half your grade’s on the line, and since there was no homework, you actually know nothing – seriously, don’t do this to yourself. Leave while you still can.

You have no friends who are taking the class. This is more of a gray area – you can either decide to make new friends (the horror!) or drop the class. There will come a time, usually around midnight the night before the first homework assignment is due, when you will sorely regret not having anyone to go to. It’s not a matter of if, it’s when – do yourself a favor and see what else is there.

 Your professor hasn’t cracked a joke in the first lecture. I’m not saying all professors have to be stand-up comedians all semester, but a professor that isn’t remotely interesting is going to make it very hard to go to lectures. If your professor hasn’t predicted attendance is going to nosedive, or told a joke at his/her expense, it’s only going to go downhill from there. Unless it’s a graduation requirement that you have to take this semester, leave.

Caveat: sometimes professors will try to lure you in with crafty jokes the first lecture, then head straight for Boresville – by this point in the semester, you should know if the class is all it’s cracked up to be.

Your professor interrupts him/herself mid-sentence. Anyone giving off the air of being senile or perhaps not quite all there should definitely be reconsidered. Disorganized lectures are the bane of any college student’s existence, resulting in notes that are half-finished and moving on to a random tangent. If you can’t follow the professor because they’re not speaking in fluid and/or full sentences, you’re pretty much doomed.

Addendum to the above: your professor speaks broken English/has an unintelligible accent. It’s not that we’re trying to be mean. Sometimes it’s genuinely impossible to understand the professor. Pull the ripcord on that one – it’s not going anywhere good.

Noticed in the early afternoon yesterday, students have discovered a new website titled “Fuck Spec“, a  website that currently has only one article. Said article is a copy of an op-ed posted by Meghan Brophy in the Columbia Daily Spectator entitled “Don’t just be a spectator” and includes annotated comments mostly criticizing and trivializing points made in the article. Brophy, a sophomore at Barnard, responded to the website criticizing her piece by posting a meme in the columbia buy sell memes Facebook group.

Brophy post regarding the FuckSpec website.

 

Advertisements have also been spotted throughout campus promoting the website.

A flyer spotted announcing the “grand opening” of Fuck Spec.

While many commenters suspected the site to be created by Bwog, known for its Fuck Spec stickers,  a writer from their team confirmed to The Lion that they are in fact not the owners of the website. A search by our team also found that the domain is in fact not owned by Bwog.

 

Know who the creator(s) of Fuck Spec are? Send in a tip by emailing us at submissions@columbialion.com

 

Photo Courtesy of Craig Rhodes  (SEAS  ’18)

As announced at the end of last semester, Shake Shack is opening a location right by campus. And thanks to a tip from one of the new location’s employees, we now know that the Columbia Shake Shack will be open starting Wednesday.

As the location prepares to open, employees can be seen cleaning the streets, loading in burger buns, and learning the new ordering systems.

For all the incoming NSOP Orientation Leaders, who report for training on the same day, Wednesday is going to be a great day for coming back to campus.

Starting today, July 24, NYC enters its 2017 Summer Restaurant Week. Despite the name, this popular event actually takes place over the course of three weeks, as the event goes until August 18. For lunch/brunch, restaurants are offering a $29 pre-fixe menu, and for dinner, they’re offering a $42 pre-fixe menu. While some restaurants offer different dishes for each meal, for others, these menus are exactly the same, so try and score a lunch reservation if you can. Or a brunch reservation if it’s the weekend!

Keep in mind, though, that certain restaurants only offer their pre-fixe menus at certain times. Many only have Monday-Friday lunch menus this year, so save yourself the disappointment and use the filters on the Restaurant Week website. You can choose whether you want a Sunday Brunch restaurant, a Monday – Friday lunch, a Monday- Friday dinner, etc. You can also select filters for neighborhood, type of cuisine, and more, and you can even check out the menu on the same site!

When booking these reservations, it’s also important to note what time the restaurants serve these meals, especially when it comes to brunch because times for brunch tend to vary the most. This might take a little sleuthing (aka going to the restaurant’s website), but it’s better than showing up to a restaurant planning on paying $29 and ending up with a $60 bill.

Here are some of the restaurants our staff at The Lion is most excited for:

  • Ai Fiori: Our managing Editor, Veronica Roach, ate here during winter restaurant week and wouldn’t stop talking about their delicious soup and dessert.
  • Nobu: It’s some of the best sushi you’ll ever have, according to Tech Team member Will Essilfie, and you get to dine somewhere Drake once rapped about. What’s not to love?
  • Gaonnuri: What makes this restaurant special isn’t the food, but the views, which are breathtaking. If you’re looking for an upscale place with amazing ambience and views, this is the place to go.
  • Red Rooster: A fantastic restaurant with an amazing vibe and menu. Great place to visit Uptown, hear some good music, and talk with friends.
  • Tao Downtown: The atmosphere at this restaurant is quite hip and resembles a bar or nightclub. The Asian food served is also quite good, but it is not one of our Directors of Campus Outreach, Yi Jun, calls authentic Chinese food.
  • Cafe Boulud: This is a good French restaurant on the Upper East Side and has a very clean and classic decor. The food is pretty good, and the restaurant has a very classy atmosphere. It is a perfect place to go to after an outing to the Metropolitan Museum or after shopping on the Upper East Side.
  • Root and Bone: Our Editor in Chief, Arlena McClenton, is eager to try Root and Bone’s shrimp and grits. She’s always searching for authentic Southern food in NYC.
  • Indochine: This restaurant is great as it was a ‘young and hip’ atmosphere and ambience. However, while the food tastes pretty good, keep in mind that it is not traditional Vietnamese cuisine but instead a French fusion.
  • Aureole: Delicious modern western cuisine that is totally worth every dollar. It is quite fancy, so be prepared to spend once you get there if you don’t go during Restaurant Week.
  • Tuome: This restaurant serves a delicious fusion of Asian and western cuisine for a reasonable price. Yi Jun, one of our Directors of Campus Outreach, would recommend it for dinner if you find yourself in the East Village.