Category: Campus Events

Photo courtesy of The Varsity Show.

The Varsity Show is Columbia’s annual student-led, theatre performance that is the one of the biggest hits of the Spring semester. This year will mark the Show’s 123rd performance, and its purpose serves to be both “subversive and sentimental,” as per its mission statement.

During the “West End Preview,” I was able to catch a sneak peek of some portions of the Show; it absolutely lived up to the hype! It captured the #struggles of a Columbia student, from being stuck in an EC wall to our fake-it-till-you-make-it attitude that dominates campus culture.

Photo courtesy of The Varsity Show.

Photo courtesy of The Varsity Show.

Because the songs and acts were performed out of context, I was unable to decipher the plot of the show, though I did discover some nuances that will give an insight into the 123rd Varsity Show.

The Show featured the head of Public Safety not only as a pseudo narrator for the audience, but also as the main instigator of mischief and chief critic of Columbia’s administration. The most detailed act of the preview revolved around a newly admitted General Studies student. Besides being ~20 years older than the rest of Columbia’s undergraduate population, there was very little to separate him from a typical first-year. As he falls in love with Columbia’s perks–from Tom’s Diner to Surf ‘n Turf–he quickly realizes that all is not well with Columbia.

Unfortunately, that’s where the preview ended! I hope this information gives you a little taste of the hilariously exciting preview I had a chance to watch. The 123rd Varsity Show will perform from April 28th to 30th. Hope to see you there!

In an email to students earlier today, Columbia Housing has announced that all housing prices will be flattened to a single rate – $9,292 – beginning next year for all upper-class residence halls. With this change, students will no longer have to decide on a building based on its cost. The change is still pending approval from Columbia’s Board of Trustees, but is likely to be approved.

The Lion has reached out to Barnard Housing to see if they plan to adopt the same pricing structure.

The full email can be found below:

Dear Students,

In response to your feedback, we are happy to announce that Columbia Housing will be changing our rates to provide for a simpler and fairer cost structure, beginning with the 2017-18 Academic Year.

Following the model of our first-year residences, all upper-class residence halls will be one rate: $9,292.*

With this new rate structure, lottery and class standing become the only determining factors in selecting a residence hall. This will allow you to choose housing based on where and with whom you want to live, not what you can afford. Additionally, with the new rate, the majority of students who live in our residence halls will see a lower average housing cost over their four years at Columbia versus the previous system.

Visit the Columbia Housing website for more information about the new rate structureplanned renovations, or Room Selection. If you have additional questions or concerns, please contact our team at housing@columbia.edu.

Best Regards,

Joyce E. Jackson
Executive Director
Columbia Housing

*Please note that this is the anticipated 2017-18 rate. Final rates are subject to approval by the Board of Trustees in June.

In an email sent to students earlier today, Dean of Columbia College, James Valentini, has notified students of the passing of Ezekiel “Zeke” Reiser, a Columbia College student who entered with the Class of 2014. Reiser, son of adjunct faculty members from GSAPP passed away over the weekend.

The full email can be found below:

Dear Students,

I am devastated to be writing to you again about the passing of a Columbia College student. Ezekiel “Zeke” Reiser, who was the son of adjunct faculty members in the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation (GSAPP) and entered Columbia College with the Class of 2014, died this weekend at his family’s home in New York.

Below is a message sent by Dean Amale Andraos to the GSAPP faculty, which includes memorial information for Zeke.

I know that many of you are still healing from other recent news. Each loss we experience takes a toll, and this has been and continues to be an incredibly difficult time for us all.

Please continue to take care of yourselves and each other and don’t hesitate to reach out to the staff throughout the University here to support you, including clinicians from Counseling and Psychological Services (212-854-2878), staff from the Office of the University Chaplain (212-854-1493), your advisers in the Berick Center for Student Advising (212-854-6378), and your Residential Life staff, including your RAs.

My thoughts are with Zeke’s family and friends, and all of you.

James J. Valentini
Dean of Columbia College and
Vice President for Undergraduate Education

cc:  Mary C. Boyce, Dean of The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science

Resources

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: GSAPP Dean’s Office <deansoffice@arch.columbia.edu>
Date: Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at 4:44 PM
Subject: Zeke Reiser

Dear Friends and colleagues,

It is with great sadness that I share the heartbreaking news of the death of Zeke Reiser, the son of our colleagues Nanako Umemoto and Jesse Reiser, this past weekend. Zeke was also a member of the Columbia community as a student at Columbia College.

A memorial ceremony is planned for 2 pm on Wednesday January 25th, at the home of Deborah Reiser, 28 South Washington Ave, Dobbs Ferry, NY 10522.

Sincerely,
Amale

Amale Andraos
Dean, Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation
Columbia University, New York

Photo Courtesy of Columbia Band Alumni

In a tip sent to The Lion, the Columbia University Marching Band has been blocked from hosting this semester’s Orgo Night in Butler 209.

Orgo Night is supposed to take place in Butler 209 at 11:59PM on 12/15. During the event, the band comments and jokes about past events on campus while helping students destress through their performances. They also perform various songs from their collection. An example of a past Orgo Night event can be found here.

The band has posted an official response to the administration’s decision:

Official Statement on Administrative Skullfuckery:

On Wednesday, December 7th, we, the leadership of the Columbia University Marching Band, the Cleverest Band in the WorldTM, received an “invitation” to meet with Provost John Coatsworth and Vice Provost and Head Librarian Ann Thornton. The original correspondence cited a desire to discuss “the band’s usage of Butler library,” with no further details provided. The meeting was held on Friday, December 9th—less than a week prior to Orgo Night.

In the meeting, Vice Provost Ann Thornton immediately informed us that Orgo Night could no longer take place in Butler, where it has been held for the last forty years. When we asked why our event, only six days away, was suddenly under fire, Vice Provost Thornton cited that Orgo Night was “a disruption of a crucial study space during an already stressful time of year,” as if kicking us out will make finals week in Butler any less stressful.

After a long and contentious meeting, the Provost and Vice Provost offered that the band and the administration take the weekend to consider their positions, formulate possible compromises, and reconvene on the following Monday, December 12th.

At this second meeting, we came prepared with a set of concessions in order to preserve the core tenet of the Orgo Night tradition: its location, Butler 209. Despite our willingness to compromise, the Provost and Vice Provost remained entirely steadfast in their position. They were unwilling to consider our proposals, and failed to offer any compromises of their own or show any understanding of our position, which is that Orgo Night held anywhere but Butler 209 is simply not Orgo Night. We were not only blindsided by their unwillingness to compromise as per our previous agreement, but we were also disturbed by the blatant lack of respect for what has become a widely-beloved campus tradition.

The tradition of having Orgo Night in Butler 209 dates back to 1975, when the Marching Band stormed Butler the night before the Organic Chemistry exam. Since then, this event has become an institutionalized tradition, adopted by the Columbia administration and recognized for what it is: a communal experience that lets everyone blow off some stress during finals week, turning

“Stress Central” into a place of singing, dancing, and Donald Trump jokes. Butler Library is an iconic location on campus, and in choosing to enter Butler, the Band disrupts not just a library but also this campus’s pervasive stress culture (where the fourth ranked school in the nation is officially ranked number one). Orgo Night is an event that is meant to remind students that it is perfectly acceptable to sidestep studying for a much-needed and well-deserved break. Seeing as Orgo Night’s presence in Butler has historically lasted no longer than 45 minutes, its benefits as a destressing mechanism and a community-building event far outweigh the cost of disrupting one reading room in one of the many study spaces on campus for less than an hour.

We are, above all else, shocked at the Provost and Vice Provost’s disrespect for their own students. Not only are they undermining a decades-long tradition on a campus infamously devoid of school spirit, but they are also making it clear to Columbia at large that fostering a community is not their priority. Furthermore, we hope this serves as a case study on the Columbia administration’s preferred method of perniciously encroaching on its own principles of “free expression”. While we appreciate their ambition in attempting to make Surf n’ Turf Columbia’s only campus tradition, we, in conjunction with our Alumni network, vow to keep fighting the good fight against the War on Fun.

Sincerely and g(tb)2 ,
The Board of the Columbia University Marching Band
P.S. CUMB to Orgo Night. Thursday, December 15, 11:59 PM.

 

Photo Courtesy of GWC-UAW Local 2110 Graduate Workers of Columbia

After counting ballots, the NLRB has revealed that Columbia’s Teaching Assistants and Researchers have overwhelmingly voted to unionize with 1, 602 in favor versus 623 against the union.

The news was first announced on GWC-UAW Local 2110 Graduate Workers of Columbia‘s Facebook page and can be found here.

With this vote, all Researchers and Teaching Assistants will be represented by the Union which will fight for higher wages and better support for this contingent of the University.

The fight for a union at Columbia has been on-going for the last two years as Columbia’s administration pushed back on recognizing a union to represent teaching assistants. In recent days, the University Provost as well as several department heads stirred controversy by sending out emails that many viewed as anti-Unionization. Alongside these, the pro-Union group racked up a series of high-profile endorsements from Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Congressman Jerry Nadler.