Category: Campus Events

In an email sent to students earlier today, Dean of Columbia College, James Valentini, has notified students of the passing of Ezekiel “Zeke” Reiser, a Columbia College student who entered with the Class of 2014. Reiser, son of adjunct faculty members from GSAPP passed away over the weekend.

The full email can be found below:

Dear Students,

I am devastated to be writing to you again about the passing of a Columbia College student. Ezekiel “Zeke” Reiser, who was the son of adjunct faculty members in the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation (GSAPP) and entered Columbia College with the Class of 2014, died this weekend at his family’s home in New York.

Below is a message sent by Dean Amale Andraos to the GSAPP faculty, which includes memorial information for Zeke.

I know that many of you are still healing from other recent news. Each loss we experience takes a toll, and this has been and continues to be an incredibly difficult time for us all.

Please continue to take care of yourselves and each other and don’t hesitate to reach out to the staff throughout the University here to support you, including clinicians from Counseling and Psychological Services (212-854-2878), staff from the Office of the University Chaplain (212-854-1493), your advisers in the Berick Center for Student Advising (212-854-6378), and your Residential Life staff, including your RAs.

My thoughts are with Zeke’s family and friends, and all of you.

James J. Valentini
Dean of Columbia College and
Vice President for Undergraduate Education

cc:  Mary C. Boyce, Dean of The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science

Resources

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: GSAPP Dean’s Office <deansoffice@arch.columbia.edu>
Date: Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at 4:44 PM
Subject: Zeke Reiser

Dear Friends and colleagues,

It is with great sadness that I share the heartbreaking news of the death of Zeke Reiser, the son of our colleagues Nanako Umemoto and Jesse Reiser, this past weekend. Zeke was also a member of the Columbia community as a student at Columbia College.

A memorial ceremony is planned for 2 pm on Wednesday January 25th, at the home of Deborah Reiser, 28 South Washington Ave, Dobbs Ferry, NY 10522.

Sincerely,
Amale

Amale Andraos
Dean, Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation
Columbia University, New York

Photo Courtesy of Columbia Band Alumni

In a tip sent to The Lion, the Columbia University Marching Band has been blocked from hosting this semester’s Orgo Night in Butler 209.

Orgo Night is supposed to take place in Butler 209 at 11:59PM on 12/15. During the event, the band comments and jokes about past events on campus while helping students destress through their performances. They also perform various songs from their collection. An example of a past Orgo Night event can be found here.

The band has posted an official response to the administration’s decision:

Official Statement on Administrative Skullfuckery:

On Wednesday, December 7th, we, the leadership of the Columbia University Marching Band, the Cleverest Band in the WorldTM, received an “invitation” to meet with Provost John Coatsworth and Vice Provost and Head Librarian Ann Thornton. The original correspondence cited a desire to discuss “the band’s usage of Butler library,” with no further details provided. The meeting was held on Friday, December 9th—less than a week prior to Orgo Night.

In the meeting, Vice Provost Ann Thornton immediately informed us that Orgo Night could no longer take place in Butler, where it has been held for the last forty years. When we asked why our event, only six days away, was suddenly under fire, Vice Provost Thornton cited that Orgo Night was “a disruption of a crucial study space during an already stressful time of year,” as if kicking us out will make finals week in Butler any less stressful.

After a long and contentious meeting, the Provost and Vice Provost offered that the band and the administration take the weekend to consider their positions, formulate possible compromises, and reconvene on the following Monday, December 12th.

At this second meeting, we came prepared with a set of concessions in order to preserve the core tenet of the Orgo Night tradition: its location, Butler 209. Despite our willingness to compromise, the Provost and Vice Provost remained entirely steadfast in their position. They were unwilling to consider our proposals, and failed to offer any compromises of their own or show any understanding of our position, which is that Orgo Night held anywhere but Butler 209 is simply not Orgo Night. We were not only blindsided by their unwillingness to compromise as per our previous agreement, but we were also disturbed by the blatant lack of respect for what has become a widely-beloved campus tradition.

The tradition of having Orgo Night in Butler 209 dates back to 1975, when the Marching Band stormed Butler the night before the Organic Chemistry exam. Since then, this event has become an institutionalized tradition, adopted by the Columbia administration and recognized for what it is: a communal experience that lets everyone blow off some stress during finals week, turning

“Stress Central” into a place of singing, dancing, and Donald Trump jokes. Butler Library is an iconic location on campus, and in choosing to enter Butler, the Band disrupts not just a library but also this campus’s pervasive stress culture (where the fourth ranked school in the nation is officially ranked number one). Orgo Night is an event that is meant to remind students that it is perfectly acceptable to sidestep studying for a much-needed and well-deserved break. Seeing as Orgo Night’s presence in Butler has historically lasted no longer than 45 minutes, its benefits as a destressing mechanism and a community-building event far outweigh the cost of disrupting one reading room in one of the many study spaces on campus for less than an hour.

We are, above all else, shocked at the Provost and Vice Provost’s disrespect for their own students. Not only are they undermining a decades-long tradition on a campus infamously devoid of school spirit, but they are also making it clear to Columbia at large that fostering a community is not their priority. Furthermore, we hope this serves as a case study on the Columbia administration’s preferred method of perniciously encroaching on its own principles of “free expression”. While we appreciate their ambition in attempting to make Surf n’ Turf Columbia’s only campus tradition, we, in conjunction with our Alumni network, vow to keep fighting the good fight against the War on Fun.

Sincerely and g(tb)2 ,
The Board of the Columbia University Marching Band
P.S. CUMB to Orgo Night. Thursday, December 15, 11:59 PM.

 

Photo Courtesy of GWC-UAW Local 2110 Graduate Workers of Columbia

After counting ballots, the NLRB has revealed that Columbia’s Teaching Assistants and Researchers have overwhelmingly voted to unionize with 1, 602 in favor versus 623 against the union.

The news was first announced on GWC-UAW Local 2110 Graduate Workers of Columbia‘s Facebook page and can be found here.

With this vote, all Researchers and Teaching Assistants will be represented by the Union which will fight for higher wages and better support for this contingent of the University.

The fight for a union at Columbia has been on-going for the last two years as Columbia’s administration pushed back on recognizing a union to represent teaching assistants. In recent days, the University Provost as well as several department heads stirred controversy by sending out emails that many viewed as anti-Unionization. Alongside these, the pro-Union group racked up a series of high-profile endorsements from Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Congressman Jerry Nadler.

 

 

Photo by Victoria Robson

As Columbia Ballet Collaborative’s performers extended their bodies in beautiful shapes at their 2016 Fall Performances, it’s easy to see the elegance, strength, and fluidity ballet dancers are known for.  While students of Columbia University and Barnard College comprise CBC, they proved that dedicating themselves to academia does not make them any less dancers. They commanded the stage at Manhattan Movement and Arts Center on November 18th and 19th with an air of professionalism. Yet they kept a youthful, fresh take on ballet, melding the traditional to modern with impeccable technique and a focus on the articulations in the music to produce more profound pieces. Their fall performances offered six pieces filled edgy and creative choreography.

The opening piece, “Symphony in G,” choreographed by Amy Hall Garner, showcased the lines of the dancers. Dressed in simple black and pancaked skin colored pointe shoes, the dancers played off the the trills and fermatas of Mozart’s music with quick footwork and moments of soaring through the air. Solos and pas de deuxs were precise and outlined each dancer. With Garner’s close attention to the nuances in the music, the piece was as if the music came to life, that the music was made for the dancers. This high energy choreography not only set the scene with beautiful technique, but also the avant garde direction for the rest of the show.

Add a little heavy metal and pure expression of the music and you’ll get “A Single Marble Block,” a fierce student-choreographed piece by Sadi Mosko CC’17 featuring movement in the dancers as well as across the stage. It began with the howling wind paired with shaking motions and isolations from the dancers. She played with the sound and bass of Pink Floyd’s “One of These Days” as well as light to create an intricate and eccentric piece. Between bursts of light, the dancers reacted to each other as they traveled from corner to corner as a unit, or perhaps as a ‘single block,’ breaking apart at times, offering deep contrast to the unity.

“No Mud No Lotus,” choreographed by Ursula Verduzco, was truly a stunning piece with a beautiful message. It began with a downpour of rain and crashing thunder where in the spotlight, individuals danced against the rain. The sense of conflict depicted from the expressive dancers and the sultry music and thunder fell away as the piece went on. It transitioned into a light and harmonious dance where the performers bourreed and pirouetted with the smooth picks of the guitar that mimicked the sound of rain. Their colorful costumes brought a swirl of hues in the enlivened dance. The piece ended in the same thunderstorm at the beginning, but with the dancer loving the rain this time. A little shift in perspective -no mud no lotus- is sometimes all you need.

Contrasting with the fluidity of the previous piece, Andrew Harper pushed the boundaries in his piece, “Lost in Space.” It was innovative and fun to say the least. Each dancer, dressed in everyday clothes, seemed to resemble us in life. Dancers were plugged into earphones where sometimes their music synced up and other times the individual voices sang out slightly different from the rest. The dancing was more freeform and expressive in individuality. The music, “American Pie,”  and moments of individual expression alludes to the uniqueness of members in a community. They follow their own beat. But, there are also moments where the voices come together to create a powerful unity between the dancers.

“Moonlight & Sonatas,” choreographed by Kevin Jenkins, featured two pairs in an elegant derivation of classical ballet. The dancers built contrast between sharpness during quick movements with smooth slows. With their impeccable technique and partnering, the dancers created an illusion of slipping out of control, only to join into flowing, free releases of tension. They created beautiful imagery and gave attention to even the slightest hand flicks, letting the movement reverberate through the body. In the intimate theater, the audience could hear the breaths of the dancers, confirming the difficulty that they make look easy.

The last piece ended the show with a display of intricate footwork and showed just how incredible the dancers in CBC are. “Us,” choreographed by Miro Magloire, took three of Bach’s preludes and fugues and showcased something different with each: gracefulness and repetition, unity and technique, and quick mirrorings with crisscrossing and weaving movements. They played on shapes, repetition, and footwork, creating a dynamic piece. It’s difficulty was evident yet the dancers were pleasant and never fatigued, always expressing themselvesto the fullest. It perfectly closed the show by leaving the audience wowed.

CBC’s fall performances were refreshing and impressive. Ballet dancers are incredible, and dancers in the Columbia Ballet Collaborative are no exception, as they showcased a new take on the traditional ballet in their stunning fall performances. Take innovative choreographers and strong, graceful dancers, and you’ll create beautiful art.

Haley So is a freshman in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Although a lover of science and math, she can’t live without a little art, ballet, or music.

Today, Provost John H. Coatsworth sent out the following email to Columbia in regards to “Responding to Post-Election Issues and Concerns”. In particular, he reaffirmed the University’s plans to protect students and guaranteed increased financial aid for undocumented students who may lose work permits due to policies proposed by President-elect Donald Trump during his presidential campaign. The full email can be read below:

Dear fellow members of the Columbia community:

The presidential election has prompted intense concern for the values we hold dear and for members of our community who are apprehensive about what the future holds. Some of this concern is focused on possible changes to immigration laws and to the federal enforcement of those laws. Some is due to possible changes elsewhere in federal law and policy. Reports of bias crimes and harassment occurring since the election are also deeply disturbing, particularly so when those who feel threatened are part of a community like ours, committed to tolerance and reason.

President Bollinger has asked me to work with the University administration and our community to develop a response to these concerns. I am writing to share information about relevant policies and our plans for ensuring that every person at Columbia feels safe, is able to proceed unimpeded with their studies and their work, and understands beyond question that Columbia’s dedication to inclusion and diversity is and will remain unwavering.

First, the University will neither allow immigration officials on our campuses without a warrant, nor share information on the immigration status of undocumented students with those officials unless required by subpoena or court order, or authorized by a student. Moreover, New York City continues to be a sanctuary city, with special protections for undocumented immigrants, and Mayor de Blasio recently affirmed that local law enforcement officials will continue to operate consistent with that commitment.

If the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival (DACA) policy is terminated or substantially curtailed and students with DACA status lose the right to work, the University pledges to expand the financial aid and other support we make available to undocumented students, regardless of their immigration status. It is of the utmost importance that federal policies and laws do not derail the education of students whose enrollment at Columbia and other colleges or universities is made possible by DACA. We subscribe to the view of the Association of American Universities that “DACA should be upheld, continued and expanded,” and we will continue to express that commitment in the future.

To provide additional support, the Office of University Life is hosting a series of small-group, private information sessions specifically for undocumented students in our community, including DACA recipients, to offer support and guidance regarding possible changes in the law. Affected students can contact the Office directly for more information. Separately, our International Students and Scholars Office (ISSO) is scheduling information sessions and is prepared to provide assistance via its telephone helplines to any of our international students with questions or concerns. For more information about resources, support, and reporting options regarding discrimination and harassment, please visit the Office of University Life website.

The commitments outlined above emerge from values that define what we stand for and who we are as a University community. Indeed, Columbia College and the School of Engineering and Applied Science have amplified their commitment to undocumented undergraduate students pursuing their first degrees by continuing to meet their full financial aid needs as has long been our policy and also by treating applications of undocumented students no differently than those of students who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents. The experience of undocumented students at the College and Columbia Engineering, from the time they first seek admission through their graduation, will not be burdened in any way by their undocumented status.

This is a moment for us to bear in mind how important it is to protect all who study and teach in our community and to defend the institution and the values it embodies.

Sincerely,

John H. Coatsworth