Category: clubs

Voting can be a tedious process, but it is also a relatively quick one. Coming out of the Iowa Caucuses, where the difference was decided by 6 coin tosses on the Democratic side, it’s hard to say that it does not matter. For all the people who don’t have the right to vote here and for those who would risk their lives to live in a democracy, please do your research and vote. Look honestly at the candidates and their records, and pick the one that best represents your values. Episode 5 of Game of Thrones will still be there for you when you get back. Here are five questions that should help you figure out how to vote absentee:

  1. Is my state holding a primary or a caucus?

If it’s a caucus, you need to be there in person in almost all cases. Check your caucus, but it’s most likely that you can’t participate and you’re better off registering in NY. Caucuses (to summarize a mind-numbingly tedious and complex process) involve filing to different sides of the room and convincing everyone who’s undecided to join one side or the other. Counting votes is usually done by counting hands raised, so delegate counts are rough representations of the popular vote at best. Your voice matters more in a caucus if you’re loud and persuasive, but you need to be home to participate. Some states have tele-caucuses for soldiers abroad and expats, but they usually exclude all students attending college out of state, as Iowa did.

 

Map of states and primary format

Map of states and primary format

  1. In order to vote, when do I have to be registered? Do I have to join a political party?

VoteForBernie.org has a complete list of the various deadlines for registration and what parties are allowed to participate in each election/caucus. Pay attention to party-change deadlines (when you affiliate by). You may have voted without registering for a party in the past, as they are often before the registration deadline for first time voters. You can check your voter registration status here.

  1. Is it better to vote in my home state or register in NYC?

If you have voted before as an Independent, Green, or Republican, then this question is N/A because NY has an archaic rule that forces you to change parties in October. First time voters, however, can still register until March. If you’d like a postmarked like a voter registration form, just email columbia4bernie@gmail.com. We won’t ask you who you’re voting for, and we will give forms to anyone.

The logic behind registering in NY is that earlier primaries matter more. If your primary is before April 19th (check at VoteForBernie.org if you don’t know), and you can comfortably register and send in your ballot there, vote there. If it’s after, it may be more beneficial to register at your college address. You should also register in NY if you’ve already missed your primary or otherwise can’t vote in it.

  1. How do I request an absentee ballot and when do I need to request it?

Order your absentee ballot and Long Distance Voter.org now please. It will take you 5 minutes. The general rule for when to apply for/request one is a month before your primary, but some states deliver the ballots much faster than others. Check request deadlines here.

  1. When do I need to send in my absentee ballot?

Send it in within two weeks of your election if you can, as most states count when the ballot is received, not when it is sent, but check here to see your state. Happy voting.

This post was submitted by Columbia and Barnard for Bernie. To respond to this piece or submit one of your own, email submissions@columbialion.com.

Looking for something entertaining to watch tonight? Head over to the basement of St. Paul’s Cathedral for Postcrypt.

Postcrypt, a weekly event that features amateur and professional talents is hosting a standup comedy event tonight at 8PM.

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Over break, Eliana Pipes (CC ’18) and a team of students released a new video series, Meet me @ The Clinic, a show about a character named Dia, who is described as “a Youtube social justice vlogger trying to fill a void” and another girl named Nina, “a girl with a lot of questions and one big secret.”

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Looking to make an impact on campus? Consider applying to join The Lion. We’re Columbia’s newest publication and the only one that pledges to post all submissions that meet our submissions policy. In addition to serving as a forum for campus discourse, we are developing products and tools to serve and connect the community.

 

Journalism

Within our Journalism team, there are two different levels of writers:

Writer:

As a writer for The Lion, you are expected to post at least once a month. Writers have general voting powers in our organization.

Contributor:

As a contributor, you can submit pieces whenever you like. Unlike a writer, contributors do not have voting powers within The Lion.

Technology and Design

Within our Technology and Design team, there are three different positions:

Developer :

As a Developer for The Lion, you will work on developing mobile applications and technical projects for the Columbia community.

Designer:

As a Designer, you will help design graphics for articles, projects, and events for The Lion.

Photographer:

As a Photographer, you will capture images of the student body for use within articles, social media, and other Lion projects. You will retain full ownership rights to any photos you take.

Operations

Within our Operations team, there are two different positions:

Events Lead:

As an Events Lead for The Lion, you will help in designing and planning events that The Lion hosts in conjunction with other on-campus groups.

Special Projects Member:

As a Special Projects Member, you will work on developing new projects and ideas for The Lion.

Campus Outreach

Within our Campus Outreach team, we have the following open position:

Outreach Member:

As an Outreach Member for The Lion, you will help in growing our readership. You will work to collect data from the student body, flyer, and plan advertising campaigns.

Ready to join?

Join our team by emailing us at operations@columbialion.com with a short note telling us about yourself and your interest(s). Those interested in joining our Leadership team will be contacted for more information.

 

Earlier today, the CU Now team released it’s newest video, CU News Tonight, a new show that looks to make light of events affecting students at Columbia.

CU Now, a series started by Shreyas Manohar (CC ’18) is known for its popular Shreyas on the Street series that follows Shreyas around campus talking with students.

Rather than bore you with multiple paragraphs telling you why you should watch their work, we recommend you check it out for yourself below.