Category: First Year

Meet Tevis. Tevis, a first-year in Columbia College is originally from Hurricane, West Virginia. We sat down with him to learn more about his interests in Economics and some of his goals while at Columbia.

What are you current passions? How do you think you’ll pursue them on campus?

I have a few that come to mind. I love singing and want to join an a cappella group at some point. I really like playing piano, so I might take some lessons here if possible. I like making people laugh and entertaining people. Mostly helping people.

When I was younger, I always asked others about the stock market. Then I finally looked at YouTube, read some articles and took AP Macro and Micro online and realized I really love it. That’s why I want to study Economics here.

Also, I’d love to start a lip sync battle club on campus. I would be fun. I am only really good at one song, but I’m learning some new songs right now.

Of everything you’ve worked on, volunteered for, and studied, what are you most proud of?

I’m happy I was the only student from my high school to come to an Ivy League and/or New York City. People in my hometown initially were shocked that I did not choose to go to school in West Virginia because of scholarship opportunities, but Columbia was my dream school.

I first visited New York in the third grade and ever since then, I’ve always wanted to live in the city. Throughout the years, I’ve visited multiple metropolitan areas (except for LA) and realized I want to go to a good university in a metropolitan area.  Then, I toured on campus (shoutout to URC tour guide Jess Hui (CC ’18)) who heavily influenced my decision to want to come here. She encouraged me, saying that I could succeed. I felt like I had a chance because I might be able to get in Early Decision. And it worked out thankfully. A lot of people from small towns want to dream about life in the big city and I’m so excited to be here. There are so many opportunities [in NYC]. Seeing websites like Lionshare, I was amazed by the numerous amount of resources here [at Columbia] that I couldn’t fathom having in West Virginia.

My end goal is to work on Board of Governors or the Federal Reserve of NYC with my buddy Alexander Hamilton.

What are you most nervous/anxious about (in regards to college, Columbia, NYC, etc)?

My grades. But that’ll work out. Obviously everyone here likely came from the top of their classes. I remember that high school felt a lot easier, but we’ll see what happens. Also, stress.

What are you most excited about (in regards to college, Columbia, NYC, etc)?

Probably looking at all the clubs and activities and internships. There’s so much to do here and it’s so overwhelming to figure out what to do.

Throughout the semester, we’ll be featuring interviews from new students. To recommend someone for an interview or to become an interviewer for The Lion, email team@columbialion.com

The following actually happened:

: “…I’m vegetarian.”

The room: *gasp* “A…a what? Did he say vegetarian?” “But what does he eat at JJ’s?” “Oh, that poor thing!”

Yeah, it’s true. Being a vegetarian kind of sucks in a country where meat is a staple food. I don’t eat chicken, beef, pork, fish, or any other kind of meat. Unfortunately for me, this means that I usually have less to choose from when I’m getting food to eat.

Back home, I had to be discerning about where I went out to eat with my friends. I had to check the menu for every local restaurant to try and find vegetarian options before I visited, and there were a lot of times where I couldn’t find anything. I never went on late-night excursions to Buffalo Wild Wings or KFC – there was no point.

But now that I’ve made it to New York City, I have a very different problem – there’s too much to choose from. Good problem? Absolutely.

For one, the dining halls have no scarcity of vegetarian and vegan food. John Jay and Ferris both mark numerous options every day as vegetarian and vegan. And what’s better, both are very clearly labeled – no longer do I have to partake in the ritual of saying, “Do you guys have anything vegetarian?”

 While JJ’s Place is geared towards burgers and chicken tenders and all that stuff (which looks delicious even to a vegetarian), even it has vegetarian options. You can get veggie burgers; you can get wraps without meat, omelets without meat, and obviously, those wonderful chocolate chip pancakes without meat. On campus, there is no scarcity of choice when it comes to finding vegetarian food.

When I go off campus into Morningside Heights and beyond, there are always vegetarian options within a block of where I’m standing. There’s so much food in New York City that statistically, there’s always a vegetarian option close by. And as with most food in the city, it’s usually good.

In most places, vegetarian food gets boring – the same old sandwiches, salads, and meals. But it’s not boring here. For once, I have choice; I have the luxury of variety.

Being a vegetarian at Columbia is way better than being a vegetarian almost anywhere else in the country. It’s nice, for once, to be in an environment where my dietary needs are fully catered to, and where I don’t have to constantly search and ask for options that suit my needs.  While the quality of food may be lackluster at times, I will always be thankful for John Jay and Ferris because I don’t want to go back to driving around in search of a Subway.

Columbia dining gets a lot of flak from the student body about what they serve, but this is one thing they got 100% right.

Looking to explore New York’s theater scene? While tickets can be expensive or hard to come by at times, we’ve compiled some of the best ways to secure yourself a seat in the theaters where it happens.

Want to enter ticket lotteries and buy tickets, but don’t feel like making the effort to leave campus? TodayTix is the perfect app for you. At the click of a button, you can buy tickets and even enter lotteries. The application is a great way to easily plan Broadway and Off-Broadway show events with your friends. You can also get $10 off your first order using the code VMANV.*
*Affiliate code
If you’re walking around Times Square and want to buy Broadway tickets at up to 50% off, visit the TKTS booth in the middle of Times Square. Everyday they sell tickets to shows with extra seats left so this is a great way to get a seat in any of the area’s popular shows.
At the start of the semester, The TIC, located in Lerner Hall begins selling discounted tickets for specific dates to certain Broadway and Off-Broadway productions. In the past, tickets have been sold at significant discounts to Hamilton, School of Rock, and Wicked. Due to the limited supply, students have been known to camp outside the TIC booth starting as early as 8AM to secure tickets to some of the more popular shows. A list of performances for the fall semester is posted on their website a few weeks before the booth opens for the semester.
General Rush:
Several productions offer discounted tickets starting at 10AM the morning of the show at their theater’s box office. If you want to secure a ticket, be sure to arrive 1-2 hours early depending on the show’s popularity.
Trying to score tickets to one of Broadway’s most in-demand productions? We can’t guarantee you tickets, but here are the best tips we have, courtesy of Allison Talker, CC ’19, and a Broadway lottery expert:
You just have to enter the online lottery every day for evening and matinee because they don’t have a live lottery any more (winners pay $10 for front row tickets). Most other shows have rush tickets that you can get at the box office at 10 am.
Right now, Hamilton has 1 live lotto on Wednesdays for the matinee. The winner is drawn at 12:30 for the 2 pm show.  Pro tip:  Fold your ticket into weird shapes.
Think we missed a good tip on how to get into Broadway shows? Send us an email at team@columbialion.com.

Being a student is tough. Fortunately, many companies and organizations realize this and offer their products to students at steeply discounted rates. Check out these free and discounted offers on technology, transportation, and more so you can spend more time worrying about classes than cash.

You Need A Budget 4

Avoid the stereotype of the broke college student by making a budget every month. According to their website, You Need A Budget offers budgeting software to college students for free if they follow these steps:

  1. Write to us at support@youneedabudget.com and include proof of registration at your college.
  2. We’ll send you a special license key, good until the end of the academic year (August 31st).
  3. At the end of the year, just shoot them another email if you’re still cranking away on your schoolwork, and they’ll send you a new license key that’s good for the next year.

Microsoft Office and OneDrive

With you .edu email, you can get the entire Microsoft Office suite and 1 terabyte of OneDrive storage for free. To sign up, visit this link.

Amazon Prime

As a college student, you are eligible to six months of Amazon Prime for free. After six months, the service is only $50 a year for college students. For those new to Amazon Prime, the service offers you free two-day shipping and access to a whole host of services including Prime Now, which promises two hour deliveries within most major cities.

Sign up here to get started with your trial and a $5 gift card (requires your .edu email).

Uber

If you’re trying to get around the city and looking to avoid the subway, make sure to sign up for Uber. Uber is a ride-hailing app that can get you around the city for a decent price (except when there’s surge pricing).

Sign up here to get your first ride free (up to $20).

*Affiliate offer code

Lyft

If you’re trying to get around the city, looking to avoid the subway, and don’t like Uber, make sure to sign up for Lyft. Lyft is a ride-hailing app that can get you around the city for a decent price (except when there’s surge pricing).

Sign up here to get your first ride free.

*Affiliate offer code

Gett

If you’re trying to get around the city and looking to avoid surge pricing, make sure to sign up for Gett. Gett is a ride-hailing app that can get you around the city for $10 flat if your destination is within Manhattan.

Sign up here to get your $10 off your first ride.

*Affiliate offer code

Lynda.com

Looking for some extra help learning new materials? Using your UNI, you have access to Lynda.com, a website that offers a treasure trove of interactive videos to teach you about nearly any subject you’re fascinated about. Log in through this link.

Adobe Creative Suite

With your Columbia email, you can get Adobe’s entire Creative Suite at a discounted rate of $20 a month. To sign up, just visit this link.

Wall Street Journal (WSJ)

Using Columbia’s CLIO system, you can get access to the Wall Street Journal. While it won’t be laid out like a newspaper, you can get access to today’s news. If you want a traditional hardcopy paper, WSJ also offers 15 Weeks for $15.

Apple

Apple has special education pricing on Macs and iPads for college students old and new. As a bonus, Apple will give you a free set of Beats Wireless Headphones with the purchase of an eligible Mac, iPhone or iPad product. To get the deal, simply visit any Apple store with proof of your acceptance to Columbia or shop through Apple’s online education website.

Local Museums

Of all the amazing reasons to go to college in New York City, the wealth of museums might be one of the best deals. And using your Columbia ID, you have access to over 3 dozen of them for free. From spending a day admiring Egyptian art at The Met to learning about the history of New York’s transit system at the Transit Museum, there’s a whole slew of opportunities that await. To find which museums we get access to for free, visit the Columbia Arts Initiative’s website here.

 

Think we missed something? Send other recommendation deals to submissions@columbialion.com

Want to find out who your Core Professor will be before their name becomes publicly visible on SSOL/Courseworks?

Starting a few weeks before classes, you can easily find your Core Professors using Columbia University Libraries’s Course Reserves system. Here’s how to do it:

1) Visit http://library.columbia.edu/find/reserves.html
2) Under “For Students” click “Reserves List”
3) Log In (using your UNI and Password)
4) View Your Professor’s Name

This trick has been successful for the last few semesters and likely will not change anytime soon. Good luck with the start of the semester!