Category: submission

This piece is in response to a piece published in “The Columbia Beacon,” which in turn was published in response to an op-ed in the “Columbia Daily Spectator.”

I hated showing my work in math class.

No, seriously, I hated it.

Take 3(4x +7) = 45. I’m sure all of you remember how to prove that this obviously is true. You have to rewrite the equation to distribute the 3 into 4x+7 to get 12x + 21 equals 45. Then, you have to subtract 21 from both sides to get 12x=24. And finally, you divide both sides by 12 to get the answer, x =2. This, again, being obvious, I would just write the answer, x=2. It wasn’t as if math stopped working if I didn’t write out the three steps on my homework along with the answer. The answer would always be two, so why did I have to waste what little energy I had on one of 46 questions I had every evening for homework?

That argument did not save me from losing points on my assignments in 7th grade.

While I love questions about how a government operates and how we justify government action much more than I loved my algebra proofs, I can see why it’s tedious. Sure, prosecutors should focus on true threats to the community and not otherwise law-abiding citizens, the executive branch in the modern era is given significant discretion on how to enforce legislation; it’s fine if the de facto result of prosecutorial discretion means that a certain group of people already determined as safe have some guarantee of safety; and amnesty through this understanding is not the worst thing that has happened to the American rule of law. But did saying any of that make it truer? Would not saying that make it falser? Life, like math, doesn’t change absent the work that went into it. And while proving these complex questions of political theory makes one a better debater, debating the validity of one’s life to everyone who asks is an exhausting exercise of existentialism.

So sure, Joey, we should show our work to the teacher. Maybe it should be in op-ed form, or The Lion, or re:claim, for the sake of posterity. But I think, to stay in math class a moment longer, Undocu is tired of algebra and wants to move on to Accelerated Multivariable Calculus, and would be happy to debate Accelerated Multivariable Calculus, but you insist on debating algebra, and there’s only so many times they can write x=2 before 800,000 pencils snap in unison. I think that’s what they mean by “reconstructed.” Most people don’t question the virtue of DACA recipients. Most Trump-reluctant Republicans prefer to look like they’re being helpful on the issue as is.

And I’m sure you could make a wonderful argument in Accelerated Multivariable Calculus without writing MS minus 13.

 

If you’d like to submit an op-ed to The Lion, email submissions@thecolumbialion.com

Photo Courtesy of Craig Rhodes  (SEAS  ’18)

As announced at the end of last semester, Shake Shack is opening a location right by campus. And thanks to a tip from one of the new location’s employees, we now know that the Columbia Shake Shack will be open starting Wednesday.

As the location prepares to open, employees can be seen cleaning the streets, loading in burger buns, and learning the new ordering systems.

For all the incoming NSOP Orientation Leaders, who report for training on the same day, Wednesday is going to be a great day for coming back to campus.

With graduation on the horizon, the Lion reached out to seniors to hear their thoughts. Here is what Lorenzo–a senior who is graduating from Columbia College with degrees in Political Science and African-American Studies–had to say.

What are you passionate about, and how has Columbia helped you find these passions?

Blackness & Black people. Columbia has helped link me to a balling ass group of Black students/professors that have helped me realize how important The Culture™ is to me.

If you could re-experience one thing you did during your time at Columbia, what would it be and why?

Fuego Friday because it was the greatest community building event to ever take place on Columbia’s campus.

What is your least favorite thing about humanity?

That we live amongst people that think it’s okay to blow their nose at the table.

If you were a Columbia library, which one would you be and why?

Teacher’s College because I’m lowkey but I’m lit af

What advice do you have for the incoming class?

Find your community. Find people and things that you love being around and be around them as much as you can. This sounds obvious, but being grounded in a community on campus is so helpful for keeping your sanity/sense of self.

With graduation on the horizon, the Lion reached out to seniors to hear their thoughts. Here is what Ke (Lisa)–a senior who is graduating from the School of Engineering and Applied Science with a degree in Electrical Engineering–had to say.

What are you passionate about, and how has Columbia helped you find these passions?

Besides technologies, which my major here is all about, I like trying various sports/games. When I first saw the list of PE courses, there were so many which I would like to try. I did take a new PE course every semester and liked all of the sports. Not only are there many choices offered, the instructors are also very good. This last semester I took fencing with a former coach of an Olympic medalist. He is a fun guy, and fencing is fun. I’ll be trying more sports after I leave Columbia. 

If you could re-experience one thing you did during your time at Columbia, what would it be and why? 

Having parties/dinners with faculties and chatting with them. I like the feel that those with great achievements or those on high positions are very approachable. It’s also interesting to hear experiences and thoughts from those of different ages. 

What is your least favorite thing about humanity?

The tendency to free-ride. People often complain about this during group works. But beyond this, it is worse, as the cause of overusing common resources, which is sad for the environment and creatures including human ourselves. 

If you were a Columbia library, which one would you be and why? 

The Science & Engineering Library. I’m an engineer. It has the best view on the top floor. 

What advice do you have for the incoming class?

Sleep well and eat healthy. Don’t put yourself under much pressure. I prefer doing things more efficiently while in a good condition than having to stay up late right before the deadline. 

With graduation on the horizon, the Lion reached out to seniors to hear their thoughts. Here is what Shreyas–a senior who is graduating from Columbia College with a degree in Astrophysics and a concentration in Computer Science–had to say.

What are you passionate about, and how has Columbia helped you find these passions?

I’m really passionate about space. I came to Columbia sort of interested in astrophysics and took a lot of incredible classes, learned about a lot of really cool research, and now I’m going to grad school and doing it for the rest of my life probably, so good job Columbia I guess!

If you could re-experience one thing you did during your time at Columbia, what would it be and why? 

The observational astronomy class at Columbia took a (free!!!) trip to Kitt Peak in Arizona when I took the class, and I would definitely love to re-experience that magical experience. If I were to do it again I would have done my homework before going out there. But just being able to sit out and look at the endless expanse of stars with a bunch of friends, and then being able to go inside and play Catan, that was awesome.

Either that, or my first Halloween on campus, or maybe my first Bacchanal. Those were dope too.

What is your least favorite thing about humanity?

People are mean sometimes, when instead they could be nice

If you were a Columbia library, which one would you be and why?

Probably the Astro library on Pupin 14. No one goes up there and they’ve got comfy couches. Or maybe NoCo; I’m a sucker for natural light. To be honest I’m not really much of a library person though, I much prefer studying at home with a few friends.

What advice do you have for the incoming class?

When you’re coming to college there’s kind of this crazy obsession with stepping outside of your comfort zone that I kind of dislike. Don’t get me wrong – exploring things outside of what you know can be really productive. But comfort is great! Take time for yourself, do things that make you happy, don’t try to do every club under the sun and every class that remotely interests you (“doing everything” is a lot harder in college than it is in high school). It’s good to be comfortable sometimes, especially during those times a little more than halfway through the semester when you feel this school weighing down on you. And if you ever feel like it’s weighing down on you too much, reach out to your professors, your friends, CPS, etc. and let them know how you’re feeling.

Also, make friends that you care about, and care about them deeply.