Tag: class of 2020

The Lion asked candidates to tell us about their campaigns to give us insight into their aspirations and motivations for running. Here is what some of the members of the Class of 2020 party LionHeart had to say:

Siddharth Singh

Are you affiliated with a party, and if so, which one?

LionHeart

What position are you running for, and what motivated you to run for it? 

Class President. During Freshman fall, my friend James Ritchie and I identified a number of problems experienced by our peers around campus. They all brought these to our attention regularly and both of us realised that it was soon our ambition to remedy these problems and serve our class to the best of our abilities. Having created LionHeart with James Ritchie, Danielle Resheff, Grant Pace and Astrid Walker-Stewart, we hope to represent our entire class by listening to feedback from students and hope that we will have another opportunity to do again. 

If elected, what would your goals be? How do you plan to actually achieve them?

We’ve identified 4 major platform points, that have been brought to our attention by members of the class and that we feel are achievable, we go into detail on how we hope to achieve them: 

1.Mental Health, 
-address underlying causes of stress culture in line with a preventative approach
-send out regular detailed updates on what CCSC has achieved regarding community health; 
-create greater incentives to attend CPS and other general mental health events; 
-produce more Stressbusters sessions – not just during midterms and finals season; 
-foster a more philanthropic atmosphere through events to give back to the community; 
-send weekly emails where we give shout-outs to members of the Class of 2020 who have done great things as well as a nominated person of the week and meme of the week;
-convey student concerns with mental health policy and CPS to the administration in tandem with the Mental Health Task Force 
-increase the number of puppy study breaks for students; 
– promote relevant stress-relieving apps which have been proven to positively impact our community’s mental health;

2. Building Community
– create new long-lasting traditions to serve the wider Columbia community (e.g. fun charity events, speed-dating, talent show, battle of the bands);
-Increase the number of affordable options for Class of 2020 apparel; 
-Be spontaneous! We can’t make the world work as we want it to, so when the opportunity comes for a fun event (great weather), we’re going to be ready to provide it for you!

3. Marginalized students 
– plan a number of events beginning with a celebration of the opening of the LGBTQ centre;
– continue to advocate for policies supporting LGBTQ students and students of color, as well as students of other marginalized identities (first-generation, low-income, international); 
– continue to improve resources for marginalized students in health services, financial aid, preprofessional advising, and more.

We are underwhelmed by the resources available to students with disabilities and would like to work with them to make Columbia a more welcoming place for all.

4. Networking and career Opportunities 
– advocate for more sophomore summer internship opportunities through working with CCE to improve Handshake powered by LionShare;
-provide you with regular updates on jobs specifically for sophomores available at CCE;
-coordinate study breaks with CCE so that we can have fun while pursuing career opportunities.

Finally, we would like to finalize our ongoing initiatives from this year. We are currently in the process of achieving subsidized MTA subway cards for students for academic, professional, and extracurricular purposes and ensuring availability of on-the-go breakfast items (along with more variety and value for your money!). LionHeart would like to continue our successful track record with our new platform for next year.

What is something you want to fix at Columbia? How would you plan to address it?

We’ve addressed the problems we’d like to fix in our platforms. All of us have now gained ample experience amongst administration, procedure and student council to know who the right contacts to approach are concerning specific changes. Having gained this knowledge over our tenure this year, any changes that we try to implement will be swifter and quicker. We also feel transparency is key amongst our class and we now intend to update the class regularly on our progress with our platform points. LionHeart also prides itself on its ability and awareness to adapt to emerging concerns on campus throughout the school year. 

Any additional comments you would like to share with voters?

We would like to encourage students to VOTE, be it for LionHeart or our opposition. We hope to see a large voter turnout because it is important that the students decide who they want to represent themselves, who they feel can make changes and who can improve there future years ahead at Columbia.

James Ritchie

Are you affiliated with a party, and if so, which one?

I am a member of the LionHeart party.

What position are you running for, and what motivated you to run for it? 

I am running to be Vice-President of the Class of 2020.  My primary motivation for running is based upon a ferocious sense of pride to represent my friends and peers in my class.  I am very thankful for the many ways that my classmates ameliorate, and contribute to, my daily life and I feel that the best way for me to give back is by serving them and advocating to the administration on their behalf.

If elected, what would your goals be? How do you plan to actually achieve them?

There are four primary points to our platform: mental health, building community, marginalised students, and networking opportunities.  I want to continue to work with the administration to address the stress culture which pervades the Columbia campus by making mental health measures preventative rather than simply palliative.  As a ticket we have several ideas for fun new traditions on campus which will help to foster a better community between the students.  I want to build on the success of the new LGBTQ centre by advocating for more access to space for students who feel marginalised on campus.  Finally I would like to work closely with the CCE to plan events which will demystify the internship process to relieve stress about finding jobs.

To see our full platform follow this link:

https://docs.google.com/a/columbia.edu/document/d/1YI_iZEPRIKyxoWjHvzYWzDuDN7Ylj3WrfWvswBn1eyE/edit?usp=sharing

What is something you want to fix at Columbia? How would you plan to address it?

My primary goal were I to be elected as Vice-President would be to combat the Columbia stress culture – something that is of course much easier said than done.  However, I believe that by being persistent and frank with the administration, and through seeking consultation from experts who are unaffiliated with the university we can make strides in the right direction.  I want to destigmatize going to CPS and make discussions of mental health a non-taboo topic which everyone feels comfortable sharing their opinions on. 

Any additional comments you would like to share with voters?

It has been an absolute pleasure serving as Vice-President so far and I would be deeply honoured if you allowed me the opportunity to continue to work on your behalf bettering the Columbia community.

Meet Perrin. Perrin, a current first year in Columbia Engineering  from Saratoga Springs, NY is a prospective Computer Science and Applied Physics double-major also planning to study abroad in his time year. We sat down with him to learn more about him and his unique interests and passions.

What are you current passions? How do you think you’ll pursue them on campus?

I am a hardcore quantum computer scientist. I’ve worked with people in the field already within it. People get taken aback by the world quantum, but I wish they wouldn’t. It’s just a way to make really fast computers that are super useful. I took a lot of weekend classes and attended at the institute for quantum computing in Canada. They built the biggest quantum computer and I took a selfie with it. I learned all this math, physics, and quantum computing in a short amount of time. I was one of 3 from the US who got to attend and I made friends with other students from around the world.

I’m working to get a research position here with a person about to get their PhD. I would be working on quantum computing algorithms and simulations.

Of everything you’ve worked on, volunteered for, and studied, what are you most proud of?

I juggled four paid jobs at once in high school. Since they were all different days and I had my regular high school studies, this was something I was proud of. I lived on my own for about a year so I took the jobs to pay for my apartment and life. I worked at Starbucks, I was a software engineer for two years, IT intern at school, and a paid sound designer at my local theater. There were times they were all at the same time and then they started cycling.

I think I accidentally stumbled on computer science in 8th grade. I think I found a programming site online and started playing with it for fun. And then I really liked physics so I had an epiphany in 10th grade that the two blend together so nicely.

What are you interested in studying here? Why?

I am a double major in SEAS with a study abroad in London. I will be on a theoretical track in computer science and an applied physics major. In this I get to also be an applied math minor just by taking the two majors. I am planning to stay next summer to do my own research through CUSP and I think I will be able to take some classes over the summer so I never have to take more than 5 required classes. There’s a couple of classes that I have some experience in that I can take over the summer to make my life a little easier.

What are you most nervous/anxious about (in regards to college, Columbia, NYC, etc)?

My school was good but not spectacular. Knowing I am going in against people with such an amazing amount of preparation is a lot. And I know it evens out after a semester or two, but it can be intimidating.

What are you most excited about (in regards to college, Columbia, NYC, etc)?

Not being bored.

The people. I came from a town where I never had a class with anyone who was Asian, Hispanic, etc.; I was the darkest-skinned person in classes. After doing diversity programs, I realized I loved genuinely learning from people of other backgrounds.

I am about to live on Broadway [plays/musicals]. I cannot imagine a better school for this. I really want to be a tour guide. I love this school so much and I want to show everyone else how amazing is. I low key convinced 10 people in the Class of 2020 to choose this school over others and I played off all of Columbia’s positives. I am still in awe of this dream place.

Any goals you have in mind? 

My biggest goal is to develop quantum computer algorithms that benefit the research aspect (like math could be used by this) but also for medical informatics. These could help with cancer research to compile more data and that would be really cool to work on. Applying it to an area that needs it rather than just building them for the hell of it. So finding the real-life applications for them. I think my dream is to be a professor who does Engineering without Borders (EWB) during the summers and some sound design at theaters between it all. I plan to join EWB on campus and the Columbia Musical Theater Society.

Why Columbia?

I first came down to visit Columbia and then went to Princeton with my friend as a joke to see how pretentious it was. I came in and went to an information session. It was so Columbia College-centric that I left afterwards. I went to the engineering experience first but I came and fell in love with it. I then applied ED and December 10th I was done. I was laughing as I watched all my friends because I was done.

There are a few professors here working on quantum computing here. One of the professors here passed away after I submitted my application, but I am happy there are still people here working on it.

I also love how small SEAS is. That’s really interesting and nice. I see NYC as the second biggest tech hub. What other schools are we competing against for all these opportunities?

Out of curiosity, what is the future of cryptography in your view?

All of our current cryptography will break, but quantum cryptography research is advancing fast. Knowing that this out there and it’s getting better compared to general quantum computing, I think that might save us (at least for now).

Throughout the semester, we’ll be featuring interviews from new students. To recommend someone for an interview or to become an interviewer for The Lion, email team@columbialion.com

As part of our elections coverage, The Lion is sharing responses from candidates about the following questions:

  1. What motivated you to run for this position?
  2. If elected, what would your goals be?
  3. What is something you want to fix at Columbia? How would you plan to address it?
  4. Any additional comments you would like to share with voters?

Below, you can find the candidate(s)’s unfiltered responses to help in deciding who you choose to vote for.

What motivated you to run for this position? 

Two main reasons: First, I have genuine need to help people, especially if there is some connection among us. That is obviously the case with SEAS 2020 students. Although we’ve only been together for a month, this is our family for the next four years of our lives. I want to be there for each and every one of them whenever they need help with an issue, have an idea, or simply want a friend to talk to—and make their freshman year the best experience. Second, I was president of my school’s student council, a very interesting experience where I design a whole new structure for the council that ended up being a success throughout the year. I knew from the start I wanted to be part of the council here at Columbia.

If elected, what would your goals be?

We want our class to shine. For that, we want to organize activities as the TedX SEAS 2020 talk and the information sessions of our major, current world engineering issues and facilities with Columbia in order to start building our path toward our future. We want to hear our class’ voices. The idea is to establish an active and personalized interaction with each student, listening to their ideas and concerns. Also, we dream about a much intimate relationship within the engineering class. Coming from a school where our class was as big as 31 people, I’m used to know everyone around me. Our SEAS class is about 10 times that number, but it is still my goal to make that family bond among us: get more involved with people within their field of study and with similar interests outside engineering.

What is something you want to fix at Columbia? How would you plan to address it?

Going back to the part of communication, I feel there is an incredible gap in the matter that might make the Columbia experience a little less enjoyable. In the debate today a party member said it was only “ideal” to establish a one-to-one relationship among engineers. I want to change that perspective and turn it into a reality. To address it, we are going to encourage all engineers to attend to our activities, we will be sending personal emails and having one-to-one conversations all year round, the SEAS lounge is also part of the plan. If the idea is getting to know each other, then that is the way!

Any additional comments you would like to share with voters?

I would like to say that, beyond our platform, is extremely important who you’re voting for. Plans can be repeated and shared from platform to platform, but the essence, identity and experience of a person cannot be mirrored on someone else. With that in mind, I would like to introduce myself a little more: I’m a very energetic, caring and joyful person with a constant positive attitude over whatever problem, regardless of the gravity. When I promise something, I will give every single part of me to fulfill it, with absolute dedication and, above all, love. I’m running for president because I can promise you help, a person you can reach to, a friend. So trust me, vote for E&B and you won’t regret it.

Photo Courtesy Finn Vigeland

At 3PM today, Columbia’s Office of Undergraduate Admissions announced that it had admitted 6% of applicants to the Class of 2020, the lowest admissions rate in CC/SEAS history. In data released to student publications, the Admissions office noted that over 36,292 applied for admission and that only 2,193 were accepted.

The full statement from Dean Jessica Marinaccio can be found below:

“Today, my colleagues and I are thrilled to welcome the newest Lions to the Columbia Class of 2020. This year’s 2,193 admitted students, selected from the largest applicant pool in Columbia’s history, amazed and humbled us with their exceptional accomplishments in and out of the classroom, their adventurous intellectualism and their commitment to a better society.

“The students admitted today, along with those admitted Early Decision, represent an extraordinarily diverse range of backgrounds and voices that we are excited to have at Columbia College and The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science. They come from all 50 states, Washington, D.C., the territories and 85 countries around the world. As our applicant pool grows, the process of selecting next year’s class becomes increasingly challenging. But we are confident that the Class of 2020 brings that unique combination of academic ability, leadership skills and personal characteristics that have distinguished Columbians over the years, and it makes today truly one of the most rewarding days for us in the Offices of Undergraduate Admissions and Financial Aid and Educational Financing.”

 

Congratulations to the incoming Class of 2020; the entire community is so excited to welcome you in the fall!