Tag: Columbia

Recently, the Columbia community has been introduced to two new terms: “woke,” and “colonized.” It seems that some people of color are “colonized”—their honest convictions and beliefs are simply evidence of assimilation to a white supremacist power structure. On the other hand, those who hold a “sufficiently racially conscious” set of beliefs are “woke.” This is more than a matter of semantics; rather it has the potential for a dangerous form of identity policing amongst people of color when casually used in an academic context.

As a person of color I find this infuriating, offensive, and when used in this context, ludicrous. This is something that has to be stopped immediately and decisively before it becomes part of our discourse. Each of us holds differing ideas for why we believe what we do and why others may see the world differently. But none of us have the right to broadly deride those who think differently as illegitimate members of their identities. To do so is to patronizingly turn “People of Color” into an exclusive moniker for those who think in a specific, narrow way. This robs all of us of our inherent right to be part of our identities and communities. No one should accept the use of this kind of language in public discourse anymore than they would any serious microaggression.

All of us, people of color and allies alike, have to draw a line in the sand at basic respect for each other. Passing personal judgments on one another says far more about us and our shortcomings than it does about others. Discourse in our community is plagued by serious structural issues. Individuals of color denouncing each other or their professors of color as “colonized,” not to mention white “allies” doing the same, would be more than enough to deal a fatal blow. If you’re comparing yourself to others please don’t refer to yourself as “woke,” and do not refer to anyone else in our community as “colonized.”

 

The Lion is the only campus publication that pledges to post all submissions that meet our open submissions policy. To respond to this piece or submit a piece of your own, email submissions@columbialion.com

Getting ready to pull another all-nighter? You’re probably looking for some tips for how to avoid that late night crash. Luckily for you, The Lion team has compiled this useful guide for the best energy drinks to keep you going and ways to effectively use them. Think we missed something? Let us know by emailing submissions@columbialion.com.

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In a surprise move, Barnard has decided to rescind its funding from the Columbia Urban Experience Program (CUE) starting with the Class of 2020. In a letter sent to past CUE participants today, Dean Alina Wong cited low participation rates of Barnard students in the pre-orientation program over the last few years for deciding to terminate the school’s relationship with the program. CUE, a pre-orientation program started by Eric Garcetti (CC ’92), allows a cohort of incoming first-years come to campus a week early to do community service work while learning about major issues affecting the city.

 

A full copy of the email can be found below.

 

Dear CUE,

 

We appreciate the time that many of you have taken to share your thoughts about CUE with us. We have read each email, and listened at each meeting. Your deep connections and invaluable experiences with CUE are impressive to hear.

 

That being said, we must also weigh other factors that surround CUE, including the organization and implementation of the program; the considerable financial and staff resources expended; and its impact on NSOP and the broader Barnard community.

 

After much consideration and a great amount of deliberation, we have decided that beginning with the Class of 2020, Barnard will no longer participate in CUE as a pre-Orientation program.  We do realize that this decision will disappoint some people, so please understand that we do not come to it lightly.  While CUE offers many opportunities, overall participation has historically been limited–both by design and fiscal realities–and the number of participating Barnard students has always been low. We believe that the positive effects experienced by CUE participants should be broadened to more students, and that engagement with community agencies should be deepened. We also believe that we need to focus the College’s resources and the attention of the students on NSOP in order to enhance the entire incoming student body’s introduction and transition to Barnard and Columbia.

 

Many details must still be finalized with our Columbia colleagues – including the continued service of Barnard CUErs as coordinators and student leaders within the program, which we will support. We recognize the ways that CUE has been a meaningful experience to many, and understand the impact of this change. Moving forward, we plan to work collaboratively and creatively with students to develop and expand existing programs that will encourage students to engage in self-awareness and direct social action, including programs offered by Barnard Student Life, Barnard Reach Out (BRO and EBRO) and the New York City Civic Engagement Program (NYCCEP). We hope that there may still be opportunities to collaborate with CUE, understanding that this will take a different form than in the past. We hope that this creates an opportunity to develop innovative ways to engage our students and the community around us.

We are sorry to bear this bad news, and we believe it is in Barnard’s best interest at this point in time. If you would like to discuss in person, please feel free to make an appointment with me.

 

Respectfully,

Dean Alina Wong

Congratulations! You’re at Columbia! Now brace yourself for a deluge of substandard teaching practices.

But seriously, what does it take to get some quality education around here? As a senior, I have taken way too many classes where either I or the TA end up teaching me how to pass the test. What’s the point in having a professor if he or she is not going to teach us anything?

Change We Can Believe In

I don’t need technology in my lectures. I know everyone’s excited about bringing Powerpoints and videos into the classroom (my high school was obsessed with SmartBoards), but have you ever taken a Gulati class? The man is brilliant with a chalkboard.

Anyways, if there is technology in a lecture, I demand a copy. Because a) it’s easier to annotate a lecture that’s already written out than copy the whole thing over again, and b) it’s like showing a kid candy and saying you can’t have any.

Post the lectures. Online. Ahead of time. Please and thank you.

Regardless of whether a class has a chalkboard, whiteboard, or Powerpoint, I need my lectures to be organized. I want you to lay out a framework, and talk about each point, in order. I do not need you to skip around, or zoom ahead so fast that no one has a chance to write anything down.

This is not conducive to learning, and it makes the whole room hate you.

Finally, let’s talk about style – public speaking skills and such. Here’s a few don’ts: do not interrupt yourself mid-sentence right when you’re coming to your point. Do not mumble in a way that makes you impossible to understand. And for the love of God, do not speak in a monotone for 2 hours.

Conspiracy Theories

It’s rumored that professors have literally no incentive to teach (other than with grade inflation). That is, tenure at Columbia depends almost exclusively on things other than teaching – we’re assuming this is published research and/or papers. If you win the Nobel Prize, you get tenure. If you have a gold nugget on CULPA, no one cares.

In this kind of system, do the student evaluations even mean anything? Furthermore, do students even mean anything? Or are classes just seen as a necessary evil on the way to a pinnacle of academia? Food for thought.

Moving on, let’s talk hypotheticals. Maybe this is all some dastardly plan to force us to teach ourselves. I mean, if you have to learn it on your own (or risk failing), then maybe students learn it better. Maybe this is supposed to teach us independence, working in ambiguity, and all of those middle school goals we were supposed to achieve.

Maybe professors think that, by handing us things, like clear formulas and logical explanations, they’re making it too easy on us. After all, we are Columbia. We’re one of the best schools in the country – maybe dealing with nonsensical lectures is how we got there.

Maybe not.

The Lion is the only campus publication that pledges to post all submissions that meet our open submissions policy. To respond to this piece or submit a piece of your own, email submissions@columbialion.com

As we approach the halfway point of the semester, we’re probably all feeling the inevitable stress that comes from managing academic workload and extracurriculars. However, if you’re looking for some new ways to apply your new academic knowledge or help in lifting campus spirit, check out the following opportunities:

Happiness Club:

Looking for a way to get involved in making students happy? Consider joining The Happiness Club:

“We are an upcoming club in the Columbia family committed to enhancing the Columbia experience through fun events and activities that will help alleviate stress, push us closer as a community, encourage acts of kindness and simply give us more reasons to smile.

Presently, we are on the look out for positive, determined and passionate individuals who are worthy of leadership roles as well as a general body of fun and enthusiastic people invested in the cause. Message us or send us an email at happinessclub.cu@gmail.com and visit us at our tabling event on October 27, 2015 to find out more.

We promise to keep you smiling from all the wonderful things you’ll do for our college community.”

 

ADI Jade:

Are you a first-year undergraduate student interested in learning more about technology? Consider applying to ADI’s JADE program:

“The January Application Development Experience (JADE) is a great way to bond with other first year students interested in technology. We are looking for first year students with some programming experience. This program will allow you to learn more about the tech community in New York City and tech resources at Columbia. ALL majors please apply, you do not need to be planning to major in Computer Science. To apply, visit this link.”

Want to feature some of your club’s upcoming events on our site? Email a blurb about your event to submissions@columbialion.com.