Tag: election

As part of our elections coverage, The Lion is sharing responses from candidates about the following questions:

  1. What motivated you to run for this position?
  2. If elected, what would your goals be?
  3. What is something you want to fix at Columbia? How would you plan to address it?
  4. Any additional comments you would like to share with voters?

Below, you can find the candidate(s)’s unfiltered responses to help in deciding who you choose to vote for.

What motivated you to run for this position? 

Two main reasons: First, I have genuine need to help people, especially if there is some connection among us. That is obviously the case with SEAS 2020 students. Although we’ve only been together for a month, this is our family for the next four years of our lives. I want to be there for each and every one of them whenever they need help with an issue, have an idea, or simply want a friend to talk to—and make their freshman year the best experience. Second, I was president of my school’s student council, a very interesting experience where I design a whole new structure for the council that ended up being a success throughout the year. I knew from the start I wanted to be part of the council here at Columbia.

If elected, what would your goals be?

We want our class to shine. For that, we want to organize activities as the TedX SEAS 2020 talk and the information sessions of our major, current world engineering issues and facilities with Columbia in order to start building our path toward our future. We want to hear our class’ voices. The idea is to establish an active and personalized interaction with each student, listening to their ideas and concerns. Also, we dream about a much intimate relationship within the engineering class. Coming from a school where our class was as big as 31 people, I’m used to know everyone around me. Our SEAS class is about 10 times that number, but it is still my goal to make that family bond among us: get more involved with people within their field of study and with similar interests outside engineering.

What is something you want to fix at Columbia? How would you plan to address it?

Going back to the part of communication, I feel there is an incredible gap in the matter that might make the Columbia experience a little less enjoyable. In the debate today a party member said it was only “ideal” to establish a one-to-one relationship among engineers. I want to change that perspective and turn it into a reality. To address it, we are going to encourage all engineers to attend to our activities, we will be sending personal emails and having one-to-one conversations all year round, the SEAS lounge is also part of the plan. If the idea is getting to know each other, then that is the way!

Any additional comments you would like to share with voters?

I would like to say that, beyond our platform, is extremely important who you’re voting for. Plans can be repeated and shared from platform to platform, but the essence, identity and experience of a person cannot be mirrored on someone else. With that in mind, I would like to introduce myself a little more: I’m a very energetic, caring and joyful person with a constant positive attitude over whatever problem, regardless of the gravity. When I promise something, I will give every single part of me to fulfill it, with absolute dedication and, above all, love. I’m running for president because I can promise you help, a person you can reach to, a friend. So trust me, vote for E&B and you won’t regret it.

The Columbia Lion wants candidates who will make a change. While many candidates brought up issues we care about: more student space, mental health improvements, and supporting students, we want a candidate who is going to do something that will make an impact. And while comforting words are nice, they don’t really do much. If we want to continue calling student government ineffective, fine, but if we want actual change, it’s time to take a risk and vote for individuals who have a passion for making change rather than people who are simply going to deliver big words and leave us with blank promises of goals for the future. For this reason, The Lion team is pleased to announce our endorsements for General Studies Student Council:
 
International Students’ Representative: Valeria Pizzi
Student Body President: Karlee Rodrigues
University Senator: Ramond Curtis
Veteran Students’ Representative: James Ward
VP Campus Life: Brett Kasner
VP Communications: Raisa Flor
VP Finance: Daria Greeno
VP Policy: SiLin Huang
Voting ends at 5PM today. Be sure to cast your vote through the link sent out by the Columbia Elections Board

Sincerely,

William Essilfie, Editor-in-Chief

Arlena McClenton, Managing Editor

Joshua Burton, Director of Operations

Yael Turitz, Director of Campus Outreach

Michele Lin, Director of Technology

Voting can be a tedious process, but it is also a relatively quick one. Coming out of the Iowa Caucuses, where the difference was decided by 6 coin tosses on the Democratic side, it’s hard to say that it does not matter. For all the people who don’t have the right to vote here and for those who would risk their lives to live in a democracy, please do your research and vote. Look honestly at the candidates and their records, and pick the one that best represents your values. Episode 5 of Game of Thrones will still be there for you when you get back. Here are five questions that should help you figure out how to vote absentee:

  1. Is my state holding a primary or a caucus?

If it’s a caucus, you need to be there in person in almost all cases. Check your caucus, but it’s most likely that you can’t participate and you’re better off registering in NY. Caucuses (to summarize a mind-numbingly tedious and complex process) involve filing to different sides of the room and convincing everyone who’s undecided to join one side or the other. Counting votes is usually done by counting hands raised, so delegate counts are rough representations of the popular vote at best. Your voice matters more in a caucus if you’re loud and persuasive, but you need to be home to participate. Some states have tele-caucuses for soldiers abroad and expats, but they usually exclude all students attending college out of state, as Iowa did.

 

Map of states and primary format

Map of states and primary format

  1. In order to vote, when do I have to be registered? Do I have to join a political party?

VoteForBernie.org has a complete list of the various deadlines for registration and what parties are allowed to participate in each election/caucus. Pay attention to party-change deadlines (when you affiliate by). You may have voted without registering for a party in the past, as they are often before the registration deadline for first time voters. You can check your voter registration status here.

  1. Is it better to vote in my home state or register in NYC?

If you have voted before as an Independent, Green, or Republican, then this question is N/A because NY has an archaic rule that forces you to change parties in October. First time voters, however, can still register until March. If you’d like a postmarked like a voter registration form, just email columbia4bernie@gmail.com. We won’t ask you who you’re voting for, and we will give forms to anyone.

The logic behind registering in NY is that earlier primaries matter more. If your primary is before April 19th (check at VoteForBernie.org if you don’t know), and you can comfortably register and send in your ballot there, vote there. If it’s after, it may be more beneficial to register at your college address. You should also register in NY if you’ve already missed your primary or otherwise can’t vote in it.

  1. How do I request an absentee ballot and when do I need to request it?

Order your absentee ballot and Long Distance Voter.org now please. It will take you 5 minutes. The general rule for when to apply for/request one is a month before your primary, but some states deliver the ballots much faster than others. Check request deadlines here.

  1. When do I need to send in my absentee ballot?

Send it in within two weeks of your election if you can, as most states count when the ballot is received, not when it is sent, but check here to see your state. Happy voting.

This post was submitted by Columbia and Barnard for Bernie. To respond to this piece or submit one of your own, email submissions@columbialion.com.