Tag: NSOP

Did you or someone you know drink a little bit too much while partying?

Unfortunately, it is not a given that this somebody will make it to a toilet or trash can. Actually, he or she probably won’t. So what are we left with? Carpets. Hardwood floors. Your furniture. Awesomeness.

Whether it’s you or someone you know doing the vomiting, you’re going to be in a pile of some pretty nasty stuff (figuratively or literally). And from within this pile, there may seem to be no way out. There will always be the stench     Where you should be aiming, ideally.

of the Milano sandwich from a few hours earlier or the Spicy Special consumed maybe a minute before. There will always be some weird discoloration, reminding you of the horror that was several tens of seconds of regurgitation.

Do not despair, young revelers. Not all hope is lost. As any senior or person who has ever dealt with a household pet or small child can tell you, vomit is not forever.

Here’s how:

1. Don’t be a jerk

If you vomited and are still incapacitated, fine, don’t clean it up. If you vomited and are totally fine (Read:rallying), don’t go around saying, “Ohhh weh looking at vomit makes me vomit. I can’t do it.” Well, looking at your vomit makes me angry, so clean it up yourself. But if it’s the first case, the situation is still dire (regarding the vomit, but also make sure the vomiter is OK first) and needs to be dealt with ASAP. Be the first responder and don’t walk away, trying to pull the same “sympathetic vomiting” crap. It’s just code for lazy and selfish. We all vomit sometimes—don’t pretend that you’re above it.

2. Locate the scene of the crime

Ok. Is it on the carpet, furniture, or hardwood floor? Figure that out.

3. Gather appropriate supplies

If it’s on carpet or furniture, you’ll need a lot. Floors, not so much. So—

-Rubber gloves, rags and towels, and absorbent paper towels (a ton) for all situations

-Carpet or furniture:Carpet or fabric cleaner (try to get one that has a brush on the top for scrubbing), disinfectant like Lysol, powder deodorizer (more effective than sprays).

-Wood:cat litter or baking soda, white vinegar

4. Get crackin’

Carpet or furniture:

-Carefully wipe up the solids. Do not push them further into the carpet or fabric. Then it’s all ruined.

-Toss that shit.

-Use a clean rag and cold water to work out (not in!) the remaining vomit.

-Lay down the carpet/fabric cleaner and do whatever the bottle says.

-Use the disinefectant on the area.

-Spread the powder deodorizer over the area. Leave it for however long the container says (overnight, even) and wipe it up with cold water in the morning.

Wood:

-Again, wipe up the solids. Don’t worry about pushing them in—it’s solid wood.

-Lay down the cat litter or baking soda and wait for the remaining liquid to turn solid.

-Wipe that up with a paper towel.

-Mix one part vinegar to three parts water in whatever receptable you’ve got.

-Wipe the floor down with this mixture.

-Wipe the floor with a dry cloth and let air dry.

5. Call Housing

After cleaning up the mess, be sure to call the Hartley Hospitality Desk so that they can send someone in to fully clean the area.

6. Move on

Vomit is not fun, but it happens. You’re a big grown up who can handle it quickly and efficiently. Or at least you sort of can now. Anyway, vomit begone and life to be lived.

 

Parts of this guide were taken from The Lion Archives post, “How to clean up vomit (Yes, really),” written by Samantha Henderson.

In a surprise move, Barnard has decided to rescind its funding from the Columbia Urban Experience Program (CUE) starting with the Class of 2020. In a letter sent to past CUE participants today, Dean Alina Wong cited low participation rates of Barnard students in the pre-orientation program over the last few years for deciding to terminate the school’s relationship with the program. CUE, a pre-orientation program started by Eric Garcetti (CC ’92), allows a cohort of incoming first-years come to campus a week early to do community service work while learning about major issues affecting the city.

 

A full copy of the email can be found below.

 

Dear CUE,

 

We appreciate the time that many of you have taken to share your thoughts about CUE with us. We have read each email, and listened at each meeting. Your deep connections and invaluable experiences with CUE are impressive to hear.

 

That being said, we must also weigh other factors that surround CUE, including the organization and implementation of the program; the considerable financial and staff resources expended; and its impact on NSOP and the broader Barnard community.

 

After much consideration and a great amount of deliberation, we have decided that beginning with the Class of 2020, Barnard will no longer participate in CUE as a pre-Orientation program.  We do realize that this decision will disappoint some people, so please understand that we do not come to it lightly.  While CUE offers many opportunities, overall participation has historically been limited–both by design and fiscal realities–and the number of participating Barnard students has always been low. We believe that the positive effects experienced by CUE participants should be broadened to more students, and that engagement with community agencies should be deepened. We also believe that we need to focus the College’s resources and the attention of the students on NSOP in order to enhance the entire incoming student body’s introduction and transition to Barnard and Columbia.

 

Many details must still be finalized with our Columbia colleagues – including the continued service of Barnard CUErs as coordinators and student leaders within the program, which we will support. We recognize the ways that CUE has been a meaningful experience to many, and understand the impact of this change. Moving forward, we plan to work collaboratively and creatively with students to develop and expand existing programs that will encourage students to engage in self-awareness and direct social action, including programs offered by Barnard Student Life, Barnard Reach Out (BRO and EBRO) and the New York City Civic Engagement Program (NYCCEP). We hope that there may still be opportunities to collaborate with CUE, understanding that this will take a different form than in the past. We hope that this creates an opportunity to develop innovative ways to engage our students and the community around us.

We are sorry to bear this bad news, and we believe it is in Barnard’s best interest at this point in time. If you would like to discuss in person, please feel free to make an appointment with me.

 

Respectfully,

Dean Alina Wong