The Lion


In the aftermath of President Trump’s election and inauguration, we asked Columbia students how they felt about the next four years. Here’s what they had to say:

 

I still haven’t really fleshed out my ideas, and it will be difficult to truly see how the election affects me until Trump’s presidency gets underway, but at the moment I’m looking at myself and I recognize I’ve enjoyed pretty much every benefit of society: I’m a well-off white male, hardly a target of misogyny or racism, so this result doesn’t affect me, existentially so, like it does my transgender classmate or Hispanic brother-in-law. But it still feels…wrong. And surreal. Yeah, it feels wrong and surreal that half the country aligns themselves with a man who represents the antithesis of many values I stand for and more importantly, the nightmares of millions of people who now how to live in fear. These people, as it is too often forgot, are HUMAN BEINGS and ought to be treated and respected as such, yet their ability to live without fear of harassment and prejudice and racism and sexism has taken a backseat to the specter of an America that becomes less great with every graffitied swastika and bigoted Facebook post.
-Bennett Smith, CC’20

 

 I think that, over the past eight years of Obama’s presidency, progressives have become somewhat complacent, not realizing that the progress we’ve made over the years is far from permanent. I think the election was really a wake-up call for liberals, and shows that, over the next four years, we’re going to have to work hard to overcome our own divisions to protect the gains we’ve made and promote a forward-thinking future. While a figure as contentious as Donald Trump has the potential to sow division, I hope that, over the next four years, progressives can reach out to those who disagree with us to understand where they’re coming from, why they believe what they believe, and whether we can find any common ground. That doesn’t have to happen in the halls of congress or the streets of NYC—it can happen right here on campus, where I think a commitment to empathy, even when uncomfortable, will serve us all well in the long-run.
-Arman Azad, CC’20

 

With the election of Donald Trump, the United States has a special chance to make much needed and unique changes. We’ve elected a man that will always put this nation and its citizens before all else. No party or ideology will come first, the partisan deadlock in Washington will come loose, and government will once again start working for the people. The days of empty rhetoric have passed. The era of real action has arrived. The next four years shine brightly ahead with the promise of new jobs, infrastructure, and investment fueled by reduced taxation and regulation and a renewed sense of faith in and love for this country. The path to a stronger, prouder, brighter America for all Americans, no matter how they identify or where they come from, is clearly set before us. With President Trump in the White House, guided as always by the invisible but all powerful grace of God, no citizen of this mighty land need worry that our Great Nation is in the right hands.
-Dante Mazza, CC ’19

 

As someone whose family still lives in a former USSR country, I’m not optimistic for the next four years given Mr. Trump’s ties to Russia. Trump’s indications that he won’t necessarily fulfill NATO obligations are a threat not to be taken lightly or brushed under the rug as he takes office. Having been in Latvia during the election made it quite clear to me who wanted what: the Latvians overwhelmingly supported Hillary despite being traditionally more conservative, while the ethnically Russian Latvian citizens were pro-Trump. On this front as well as all others, I can only say that the best case scenario is one in which he accomplishes nothing over the next four years.
Molly Mittler, BC ’19

 

The election of this president is emblematic of a bigger issue that encompasses racism, sexism, and xenophobia. The policies that his cabinet and his nominees have stated or even hinted at will transcend those barriers of effect. Donald Trump is obviously different from previous presidents. While the war on drugs destroyed the lives of black people, and while presidential silence on the AIDS crisis echoed the apathy for the death of so many, Trump’s policies will also affect the base that so eagerly voted for him. While I may lose the critical benefits awarded to me by a party that is at least trying, benefits that made many of us apathetic to the horrors that could so easily come from our complacency with the system, the one solace that may possibly console me is that the ignorant, the angry, and the misinformed which so eagerly voted for a demagogue will feel the repercussions of these next four years too. But, in the words of Dylan Thomas, we will not go gentle into that good night. The best of us will pull the country forward kicking and screaming like we have done so many times before. We will work to protect the rights of women, and the rights of minorities, and the rights of those less fortunate through marches, protests, sit-ins, and in the most important way of all, by voting in 2018 and 2020.
-Rafael Ortiz, CC’19

 

The inauguration of Trump makes me uncertain as an immigrant, a black person and a woman. Insecure of how emboldened racists and sexists feel right now with such a man as president for the next four years. I literally have four years before I complete my undergrad and I have never been this involved in American politics because this time it directly affects me. It is definitely interesting to watch how the years will unfold.
-Cynthia Welinga, BC’ 20



I find it disheartening and appalling that many have been defending this presidential outcome as democracy. Though President Trump was elected democratically, the notion of democracy, itself, has been lost. We are dangerously close, if not there already, to a state of tyranny upholding its ways in a veil of democratic values. We, as a nation, have fought hard for the past eight years to reestablish a sense of democracy, equal values and unity within the people. This election puts all we have fought for at risk. “We will not be divided” seems to be a popular response to the election, and I stand by it. However, the division which we must understand is that of the people and the sovereign. Our 45th President does not have interest in his people, but in our nations wealth. A businessman is not fit for president because his interest lies in the acquisition of property and not the well being of his people. He will bring forth this division which we are so strongly trying to avoid. He will bring upon us violence. These are dark times for us all. The misconstrued understanding of anarchy is not to go to war, but to reestablish equality. We must stand strong and fight against this formation of fascism and tyranny.
-Petros Gourgouris, CC’17

 

Although Trump’s message smacked too much of his campaign rhetoric and lacked unity, the inauguration was remarkable. Simultaneously in Gambia, a political transition also took place. But that one only happened because an international coalition forced a tyrant to step down; and it is for that reason–the reliability of the American government and sensibility of the American people–that I’m cautiously optimistic for the next administration.
-Blake Mueller, CC’18

 

Although I am disappointed with the outcome of the election, and the direction the Trump administration seems to be setting out for itself, I take heart in what President Obama said before leaving office. All Americans work together to bring about positive change. This is not a power reserved for one man. That being said, there are many people Trump’s administration affects far more intimately than myself, both in proposed policies and the culture it promotes. It falls on all of us to stand united to protect each other’s rights and liberties. I am hopeful we will do so moving forward. The millions at women’s marches across the world are evidence of our resolve to fight for one another.
-Scott Aronin, CC’15

 

To me, this inauguration represents the culmination of a political strategy of divisive racial discourse, fear mongering, and manipulation of basic facts that has ultimately put a party in power that unabashedly does the bidding of the rich elites of our country while concurrently tricking millions of poor citizens to vote for them. Never before has someone served as president who is the sole embodiment of a rich, white, privileged class who is the enemy of a robust, prosperous, and diverse middle and lower class, and who has continuosly served to divide the American populace and has weakened us as a nation. Reading about the gutting of basic rights in this country such as health care for tens of millions is heartbreaking, but it gives me hope that Columbians and young people across the country and world are not content to allow Donald Trump to systematically strip us of our power and our voice. For the next four years I know that Columbians will be on the front lines of the fight to protect our future from those in the American government who seek to destroy it .
-Adam Buford, CC’19

 

I think we’re going to learn a very hard lesson about idolatry in politics. One we should have learned before.
-Mae Graham, CC’18
If you’d like to submit a piece to the Lion, please email submissions@thecolumbialion.com.

Every year, my family visits my grandparents in Florida and spends a week or two on the beach and in the ocean.

Every year, my favorite thing to do is walk along the edge of the water looking for the little black shark teeth that I’ve been collecting for years. My younger cousin once asked me why they were black. I explained that they had been fossilized over millions of years, the white bone slowly being replaced with dark minerals. My aunt and grandmother cut me off and demanded to know where I’d heard such stories. They were angry with me. I was asked not to say these things in front of my cousins. When my family returned home from vacation, we started receiving a monthly Young Earth Creationism magazine addressed specifically to me.

I was surprised. I was raised as a Christian, and I was raised to be tolerant of other people’s views. My parents stressed the importance of listening to different beliefs without trying to change them to match my own. I am a member of the most widely accepted religion in America, and I grew up in a heavily Christian small town. No one had ever told me outright that my religion is wrong. So I was amazed that when someone finally confronted me to try to change my beliefs, it was someone who attends my church every time they’re in town.

This argument has raged since Darwin’s theories were published. Each side points to inconsistencies in the other in an attempt to prove their own superiority and truthfulness. Each side accuses the other of teaching false information to our youth and leading them astray. One side says that if you do not adhere to their specific beliefs, you cannot be truly Christian. The other says that if you do not support their views, then you are ignorant to the facts in the world around you.

This intolerance seems ironic when one of the core tenets of the religion is love and understanding for your neighbors. The problem is, when you dismiss a person’s beliefs as false and blasphemous, you are attacking not only the person themselves but also the way they were raised. You are saying that you were raised and educated correctly, and thus they should take your word and learn from you. You are placing yourself in the superior position, and then trying to explain why your view is correct. But now the other person is on the defensive side, faced with disdain for their views. Chances are, they are no longer interested in hearing justification. They are now only interesting in proving the value in their own beliefs, protecting themselves from this attack. The conversation has turned into each person standing on either side of a gorge, throwing facts and quotes across the gap like rocks at the person on the other side. There is no connection between them. None of the information actually makes contact because neither side is focused on catching the rocks; they are only focused on staying standing longer than the person on the other side.

Nothing is gained from this debate. There is no real discussion because the focus is not on understanding or gaining knowledge. Christianity centers around kindness, mercy, understanding, and compassion, but this division shows none of these traits.

I still visit my grandparents every summer, and several times I have approached my extended family to try to talk through this difference. The first few times they happily provided me with a long lecture. Other times it devolved into an argument. Later on, the topic was avoided entirely. This seems to be the trend in this debate; it is either one-sided, or it is competitively two-sided, or it is completely ignored. None of these outcomes are remotely helpful in closing this gap between people who should feel unified in the beliefs they do share.

The only way to bring these opposing sides together is to approach the problem differently. It should not be a match or competition. At the end of the discussion, there does not need to be a drastic change in the beliefs of either party. What matters is that both parties have been made to think about their own stance as well as the other. If both sides can emerge from the conversation with a greater knowledge of the other view, without animosity or offense, then this is a step closer to understanding. This gap can be closed, so long as we stop throwing rocks across the gorge and start building the bridge from both sides.

The Lion is the only campus publication with an open-submissions policy. To respond to this op-ed or to submit one of your own, email submissions@columbialion.com.

In a press release today, Columbia has announced outgoing Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew will begin teaching as a Visiting Professor at SIPA starting next month.

The full press release can be found below:

Columbia University announced that outgoing Secretary of the Treasury Jacob “Jack” Lew would be joining its School of International and Public Affairs faculty as a visiting professor in February. He will lecture, teach graduate students, and work with faculty members at the school and across the University on the subjects of international economics, fiscal and trade policy, and a range of other public policy issues.

“As a school committed to the highest level of both academic scholarship and producing leaders in public policy and international relations, we are delighted to have someone with Secretary Lew’s unique government leadership experience join us,” said Dean Merit E. Janow, herself a former Deputy Assistant U.S. Trade Representative who later served as one of the seven members of the World Trade Organization’s (WTO) Appellate Body. “At a time when we are all concerned with issues of global economic growth, trade and finance, our federal budget, tax system and the challenge of creating economic opportunity, Jack Lew brings insights borne of years of experience from the academy and the most senior decision making roles in the US and global economy.”

“Columbia’s School of International and Public Affairs is central to the university’s mission of applying scholarly expertise and practical experience to understanding the world and addressing its problems,” said Columbia President Lee C. Bollinger. “Our university community is better able to serve that mission when we welcome leaders like Secretary Lew who possess deep first-hand knowledge about the workings of the U.S. government and international institutions. He will be an invaluable addition to our faculty, and an asset for our students who will benefit greatly from all that he has to teach them.”

“SIPA is at the forefront of tackling critical policy challenges facing the global community. I am delighted to have the opportunity to share my experience with talented young people who aspire to engage in the world of public policy and international affairs. I am impressed with the strength of Columbia’s faculty, students and thought leadership and look forward to making a contribution to the education of a new generation of leaders,” said Jacob J. Lew.

Secretary Lew has led the Treasury Department since 2013. He took office as the U.S. economy was struggling to regain its footing after the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression. He helped lead the U.S. economy to its current foundation of economic growth and declining unemployment.

Prior to serving as Treasury Secretary, Lew was White House Chief of Staff and Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), a position he also held from 1998 to 2001. As White House Chief of Staff, Lew advised the President on issues from politics to policy. Before joining the Obama administration in 2009, initially as Deputy Secretary of State for Management and Resources, Lew served as a managing director and chief operating officer at Citigroup, and executive vice president and chief operating officer of New York University, where he was also a professor of public administration.

As OMB Director from 1998 to 2001, Lew led the Clinton Administration’s budget team and served as a member of the National Security Council. He was Special Assistant to the President from 1993 to 1994.

Lew began his career in Washington in 1973 as a legislative aide. From 1979 to 1987, he was a principal domestic policy advisor to House Speaker Thomas P. O’Neill, Jr.

A graduate of Harvard College and Georgetown University Law Center, Lew is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the National Academy of Social Insurance. His appointment will begin on February 1, 2017.

In an email sent to members of the Columbia community earlier today, the University has confirmed the passing of Yi-Chia “Mia” Chen from an apparent suicide. Chen, an exchange student from Waseda University in Japan had been a part of Columbia College. The full email from James Valentini, Dean of Columbia College can be found below:

As we enter a new semester, we think it is important to share resources available on campus to members of the Columbia community:

Student Resources:

Email from Dean James Valentini:

 

Dear Students,

With a heavy heart, I am writing to let you know about the loss of a member of our community. Yi-Chia “Mia” Chen, an exchange student at Columbia College from Waseda University in Japan, has died in an apparent suicide.

We have begun reaching out to Mia’s friends and classmates whom we could identify to provide support and assistance during this difficult time. Whether or not you knew Mia, you may wish to gather with other community members. We have set up a space for reflection and conversation from 7-9 p.m. on Broadway 14th floor East and McBain Main Lounge.

This is an especially difficult time for all of us. As you know, we mourned the loss of another Columbia College student in December. Please don’t hesitate to reach out to your advisers, your Residential Life staff, Counseling and Psychological Services, the Office of the University Chaplain, your faculty members, and family and friends for support.

The following resources are available to you:

  • The Broadway Residence Hall 14th Floor East Lounge and the McBain Main Lounge will be open as gathering spaces from 7-9 p.m. today. Staff from Counseling and Psychological Services, the Office of University Chaplain, and Residential Life will be in attendance. Anytime before 7 p.m., staff from Residential Life will also be available in Broadway 103 for drop-in visits.
  • In addition to their regular hours, Counseling and Psychological Services (212-854-2878) will offer extended walk-in hours:
    • 5-10 p.m. tonight and tomorrow in the CPS office in Broadway Hall
    • All day today and tomorrow until 10 p.m. on the fifth floor of Lerner Hall
  • The Office of the University Chaplain (212-854-1493) in Earl Hall and St. Paul’s Chapel will be open until 10 p.m. for individual or group counseling.
  • Your advisers in the Berick Center for Student Advising (212-854-6378) are available to talk with you about any concerns.
  • You can seek support from Residential Life staff at any time, who may connect you with additional resources.

I know that all of you join me in sending our deepest condolences to Mia’s family and friends.

Sincerely,
James J. Valentini
Dean of Columbia College and
Vice President for Undergraduate Education

cc: Mary C. Boyce, Dean of The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science

Resources

 

Do you often find yourself in a large lecture course required for your major and lose focus ten minutes in? Do you wonder if it’s even worth going to class, and decide your time would be better spent studying (or sleeping)?

In a previous column, I proposed that the current method of teaching undergraduates is increasingly at odds with mounting evidence from both education research and neuroscience. This column, I’ll be proposing a few easy and evidence-based fixes to make lecture courses not only more fun and engaging for students, but also easier for professors to teach in a more effective way.

My advice boils down to one simple idea: turn lecture courses into a hub of social activity. If you’re looking for the nitty-gritty of how to implement this technique either as a student or professor, stay tuned for next week’s column — this one is going to focus on the scientific rationale behind my advice.

It might seem counterintuitive that letting students engage in ‘distracting’ activities like talking in class results in greater learning, but education research has been supporting this idea for decades. One recent meta review of over 400 studies showed that engaging active learning techniques focused on social activity in lectures boosted not only the overall average grade, but also most improved the grades of those at the bottom of the class, without decreasing the high scores of those at the top.

Essentially, social learning has a ‘rising tides float all boats’ effect.

The most well-tested way to implement social learning comes from the well-studied ‘flipped classroom’ technique. In this approach, the ‘lecture’ component of the class is assigned as homework to be completed prior to the class, most commonly as a video file and more rarely as an interactive online assignment or textbook readings. In class, students are assigned to work on problem sets or discuss the material in groups, with the professor and TAs as facilitators who ‘check in’ with groups by answering questions and offering guidance. This model actively encourages cooperation and lively discussion among classmates. Sounds more fun than your normal lecture, right?

Now for the neuroscience. Humans are fundamentally social animals, with much larger brain regions dedicated to analyzing and understanding the emotions and motivations of other people. Social activity is so important to us that our ‘default’ brain network, the one that activates when you’re daydreaming or not thinking about much at all, overlaps heavily with your brain’s go-to area of activation for social activity, the mentalizing network. Your brain ‘wants’ to be in this state, because historically, cooperation with peers has been mutually beneficial to survival.

Social activity is in fact so rewarding that interacting with other people triggers a huge release of domaine, the same ‘feel-good’ neurotransmitter responsible for chemically induced highs. Amazingly, the release of dopamine can also enhance the brain’s ability to create and store new memories. So to sum up, feeling happy while learning is not only positive for your well being, but can actually help to improve your memory.

It’s no wonder that social activity plays a massive role in our lives and correspondingly holds a massive influence over our brains. But by forcing students to unnaturally focus on fast-paced and unvaried information flow, traditional lectures put an unduly heavy strain on the brain’s working memory network.

As a lecture goes on, the brain’s pull to ‘wander’ gets more intense, and focus is eventually lost. Social learning works so well because it hijacks this drive to socialize and redirects it towards learning. By engaging the default/mentalizing network, group work enhances a student’s ability to focus for long periods of time, and the extra dopamine released from socialization helps that information be better retained.

Engaging in more socialization can have many positive side effects as well. Long-standing issues in the Columbia community revolve around the oppressive stress-culture and feeling of loneliness experienced by many students.

While switching to a social-learning based classroom environment won’t magically fix these issues, many sociological experiments on undergraduate populations link stronger social bonds to myriad positive outcomes, including but not limited to increased student happiness, improved levels of student well-being, lower rates of anxiety and depression, and more successful career outcomes post-graduation.

It’s not too much of a stretch to imagine that encouraged socialization in the classroom can lead to more casual conversation and foster friendships outside of the classroom’s confines, creating a stronger and healthier community in the process.

With so much to gain and nothing to lose, I advocate for Columbia professors opening a dialogue around the efficacy of the lecture course and opening their classrooms to experimental techniques. Decades of support from educational research combined with exciting new evidence from the emerging field of neuroeducation combine to form a compelling case for social learning.

A small amount of effort in redesigning course curricula and pre-recording lecture segments can pay off in happier, more engaged students who are not only excited to learn, but can also retain information better and for longer. For both professors and students, incorporating social learning in the classroom is a win-win.
*While based in pre-existing research, the hypothesis about social learning put forth is my own original work and is further explained in a long-form scientific article (The Case for Social Learning). Contact the author for further information.

In an email sent to students earlier today, Provost John Coatsworth notified students and teaching assistants behind the University’s rationale in challenging the vote to decide whether Teaching Assistants should unionize that was overwhelmingly supported by eligible voters based on its results.

The full email can be found below:

Dear fellow members of the Columbia community:

Last month, after an election to determine whether Columbia’s research and teaching assistants will be represented by the United Auto Workers, the University formally asked the National Labor Relations Board to examine whether certain actions by union representatives and Board agents responsible for supervising the election improperly affected the election outcome. I am writing to explain why we did so.

All of us have chosen to be part of this community because we value different viewpoints and believe that individual rights matter. Actions that could intimidate voters or create the impression of surveillance, such as installing a camera operated by union supporters just steps from the polling place in Earl Hall, are inconsistent with these basic values and violate NLRB election rules. In addition, the NLRB Regional Office’s reversal regarding the presentation of identification at the polls (first requiring, then encouraging, then ultimately not even allowing poll watchers to request IDs), not only created confusion but had the likely effect of allowing ineligible voters to vote, while forcing eligible voters to cast challenged ballots. Students arrived at Earl Hall only to be told that their names already had been checked off as having voted there.

If there were a means to protect voters’ rights and compliance with NLRB rules without filing objections with the NLRB, or, for that matter, if students troubled by these violations and others during the election were able to raise their concerns directly with the NLRB, we could have considered a different course. However, those alternatives do not exist: Under the National Labor Relations Act, our filing of objections is the sole available recourse for ensuring compliance with rules governing the election and to speak on behalf of student voters who have no independent voice in the process. The NLRB has responded to our filing by recognizing that the objections we raised, “if true, could have affected the outcome of the election and would, therefore, warrant setting aside the election.” The Board has scheduled a hearing in this matter later in the month.

I want to be clear that the University has taken this action mindful of concerns that extend beyond the outcome of last month’s election and the manner in which it was conducted. Our academic community may be operating within a new and very different framework for engaging with research and teaching assistants and for preparing them to have careers as scholars, the latter being one of our core functions as a university. That new framework would be governed by federal law and by the National Labor Relations Board.

In this setting, the prevailing rules must be scrupulously observed by all parties if we are to reach fair outcomes and effectively support all of our teaching and research assistants. As I said on many occasions before and after last month’s election, we will continue to strive so that Columbia remains a place where every student can achieve the highest levels of intellectual accomplishment and personal fulfillment. The actions taken by the University since the election should be understood as consistent with, and essential to that commitment.

Sincerely,

John H. Coatsworth

Provost

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Happy Holidays! What better way to celebrate than with a column on overthinking and terrorism? In summary, this post is essentially just one gigantic middle finger to human emotion and irrationality.

Sex and violence. Violence and sex. Two majestic beasts, when boiled down to the very basal level are actually rather simple. Take for example, sex. I’ll save you the gory details, mainly because I know my mother is probably reading this, but essentially sex works as follows: “Hey wanna have sex?” To which the other responds yes or no. That’s it! There is not even uncalled for pussy grabbing involved, surprise, surprise! Violence too, is essentially as black and white, except in this instance; a person may ask, “Is there any other means to which I can get this person to work with me?” Violence inherently tags along with a negative answer.

No, it’s not until you are in bed alone on an early Sunday evening replaying the previous evening in your mind as your phone sits as quite as a mime next to you, when emotion comes lurking up under the covers and grabs you, that relationships become hard. Emotion beats the living shit out of your memory or interpretation of your relationship, simultaneously transforming it and weighing it down, anchoring you to a malicious carbon copy of something that was once so beautiful and simple.

Emotion uses the same tactics in political violence. Political violence is merely a statement, or rebellion until emotion, disguised as mass fear, is invited to the party. Emotion aggrandizes single acts of political violence, painting perpetrators as grandiose colonels of an unknown but powerful aggressor, ultimately yielding an effective tactic known as terrorism. Terrorism then, is a byproduct of emotion.

This is why humans suck. But lucky for us, we also come equipped with this handy little thing called logic.

The other day, I was Facetiming with my best friend, bawling my eyes out because I witnessed a man I was VERY interested in fall for my much cooler other friend. (I know what you must be thinking here 1) this seems to be a reoccurring theme with Jamie’s columns and 2) we need to find Jamie a different pool of men… and to be honest, I would agree with both of those thoughts). Anyway, I digress. As I was crying, she interrupted me and told me to think of the situation in a logical manner. She and I then went through the situation point by point, wiping away the damage done by emotion with logic, her pointing out essential things such as “he isn’t going to be around much longer because he is moving so it doesn’t really matter anyway” that emotion had completely blurred from my mind. After our conversation I instantly felt a sense of relief and was able to move on.

Why then, can we not apply the same tactic to terrorism? When hyperbolic images of seemingly irrational acts of chaos and destruction inundate our news feeds with a label of “terrorism” haphazardly plastered to them, logic can trump fear. Logic would suggest that sensational reactions are exactly the goals of terrorist attacks, and by not providing that, terrorism begins to fail. Only when people begin to use logic to see terrorism as the emotional phenomenon it is will terrorism begin to become less and less prevalent in today’s society.

In an email sent to students moments ago, Columbia has confirmed the passing of Mounia Abousaid (CC ’17), a resident of Broadway Residence Hall.

The full email can be found below:

Dear Students,

It is with great sadness that I write with some difficult news for our community. Mounia Abousaid, a Columbia College senior from Rabat, Morocco, and a resident of Broadway Hall, has passed away.

Mounia was a Comparative Literature and Society major who came to Columbia from the United World College in New Mexico, and was previously recognized for campus contributions with a King’s Crown Leadership Award. We have been in contact with Mounia’s family to provide support and assistance during this difficult time.

When we lose a member of our community, we are all affected. I encourage you to rely on one another and on University resources for support. The Broadway Residence Hall 14th Floor West Lounge will be open as a gathering space from noon until 5 p.m. today. Staff from offices including Counseling and Psychological Services, Residential Life and the Office of the University Chaplain will be there to support you.

Counseling and Psychological Services (212-854-2878) will have walk-in hours today from 6 to 9 p.m. on the 5th floor of Lerner Hall, 100 Carman Hall, 600 W. 113th St, Room 2BB, and 102 Broadway Hall, in addition to their regular hours in Lerner Hall. You may also seek support from Residential Life staff, as well as the Office of the University Chaplain (212-854-1493).

Your advisers in the Berick Center for Student Advising (212-854-6378) are also available to talk with you about any concerns. Please reach out if you feel that your finals or your academic work is being affected.

As you finish your finals this week, please take care of yourself and those around you. I know that all of you join me in sending our deepest condolences to Mounia’s family and friends, and ask that you keep them in your thoughts in the days ahead.

Sincerely,

James J. Valentini
Dean of Columbia College and
Vice President for Undergraduate Education

cc: Mary C. Boyce, Dean of The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science

Student Resources:

Photo Courtesy of CUBE

Step into another world and dive into wonderland with Columbia University Ballet Ensemble (CUBE)!

In this stressful time of the year, CUBE delivered a much-needed, light-hearted rendition of Alice In Wonderland, brightening up finals season. On December 8th and 9th, ballet dancers in CUBE took on the enchanting characters we all love, and turned them into delightful dancers. The performance featured a beautiful, expressive Alice, danced by Kasey Broekema, wandering her way through Wonderland, meeting characters such as the time-absorbed white rabbit, danced by Kyryk Pavlovsky, the mysterious Caterpillar, danced by Sophia Salingaros, the playful Mad Hatter, danced by Trevor Menders, and of course the feisty and elegant Queen of Hearts, danced by Anna McEvoy-Melo. The dancers playing lead roles were evidently accomplished and skilled as they pirouetted on pointe or leaped across the stage in their challenging choreography. Their acting and expression through their bodies brought the characters to life as well.

CUBE is lauded for their ability to integrate all levels of dancers while creating a cohesive piece. Alice in Wonderland was the  perfect example of how to do just that. With beautiful choreography for each dancer, CUBE highlighted everyone in all their dances, from Flamingos to Flowers to Cards.

Opening night was full of excitement and energy. The expressiveness of the dancers particularly stood out as they told the story of Alice falling through the rabbit hole to trying to save the Knave from the wrath of the queen. I only wish there were a larger audience to cheer on their work. CUBE’s Alice in Wonderland was a laudable and charming performance that left me wanting to follow the Alice down the rabbit hole to wonderland.

Haley So is a first year in SEAS who wishes she could dance and be as fierce as the Queen of Hearts.